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Image from page 390 of "Peking : a social survey conducted under auspices of the Princeton University Center in China and the Peking Young Men's Christian Association" (1921) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 390 of "Peking : a social survey conducted under auspices of the Princeton University Center in China and the Peking Young Men's Christian Association" (1921)

Identifier: cu31924023436193

Title: Peking : a social survey conducted under auspices of the Princeton University Center in China and the Peking Young Men's Christian Association

Year: 1921 (1920s)

Authors: Gamble, Sidney D. (Sidney David), 1890-1968 Burgess, John Stewart, b. 1883 Princeton University Center in China Young Men's Christian Association (Beijing, China)

Subjects: Social surveys

Publisher: New York : George H. Doran Co.

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

nd it, but it does seem to make it possible for agreat many able-bodied men to live in idleness and force theother members of their family to support them. DAILY HOURS OF WORK In making the survey, an attempt was made to find out howmany hours a day the members of the church families wereworking, how much night and Sunday work they had, how manyof them were unemployed and what they considered to be thecause of their unemplo)mient, but the question concerning thehours of work was the only one that was answered at all, andthe answers to it were relatively few. Of the 129 men whoanswered the question, two-thirds said they were working eighthours or less a day, 8 percent were working ten or twelve hours,while 20 percent stated that they were working all day. Thereseemed to be no trace of the long hours known to be prevalent insome industries. HOME OWNING Only 22 percent of the church families own their own homes,which is a somewhat smaller proportion than is found in the CHURCH SURVEY 855

 

Text Appearing After Image:

TENG SHIH ICOU == == PEI TANG Figure 33: Rent Per Room Per Month CHI HUA MENTOTAL American cities. There, from 26 to 31 percent of the families owntheir homes.^ In the three churches the proportion of familiesowning their homes varies from 17 percent in the Teng ShihKou to 2] percent in the Pei Tang. NO RENT Twenty-six percent of the famiUes that do not own their ownhomes pay no rent. They are given their room by their em-ployer, an institution or a friend. Of the 89 in this group, 20are living in the Old Ladies Home or the Poorhouse, 21 arein school, 15 are living in rooms that belong to the church ormission, and 10 are given their room by a friend or relative. RENTS PAID The families that rent their homes pay anywhere from 30 centsto $40 a month; 20 percent pay less than $1.00 a month, 54percent pay less than $2.00 a month, and only 10 percent paymore than $10 a month. The rents paid by the Chi Hua Menfamihes are naturally the smallest. Their average rent is$1.20 a family per month,

  

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Taken circa 1921