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Image from page 480 of "The call of the stars; a popular introduction to a knowledge of the starry skies with their romance and legend" (1919) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 480 of "The call of the stars; a popular introduction to a knowledge of the starry skies with their romance and legend" (1919)

Identifier: callofstarspopul00kipp

Title: The call of the stars; a popular introduction to a knowledge of the starry skies with their romance and legend

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Kippax, John R. (John Robert), 1849-1922

Subjects: Stars Constellations Planets

Publisher: New York, London, G. P. Putnam's sons

Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

enty-nineand a half terrestrial years (2946 yrs.),—a Satumianyear—at a velocity of about six miles a second. Itsdistance from the luminary varies between 911,000,000miles at aphelion, and 861,000,000 miles at perihelion.From the Earth the planets distance varies between1,028,000,000 miles at the most remote conjimction,and 744,000,000 miles at the most favourable opposition.Its synodic period, the interval from opposition toopposition, is 378 days, so that the planet returns eachyear about thirteen days later than the year previous.It travels eastward along the ecliptic about one degreea month, and remains, on an average, for nearly twoand a half years in each constellation. Once each year,when in opposition, a slight apparent retrograde motionof some five degrees occurs, due to the Earths overtak-ing and passing the planet. The planet was in opposition December, 1913, in theconstellation Taurus, and the next opposition will oc-cur during the third week in December, 1914, when the

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Yerkes Observatory ■ Plate XXXVIII. The Planet Saturn (Rings on edge, showing condensations) Jupiter and Saturn 391 planet will be about on the border line between Taurusand Gemini, and will be at its brightest. It will be inopposition again the first week in January, 1916, aboutthe middle of January, 1917, and near the last of Jan-uary ini9i8. Ini9i6 and 1917 it will be in the constel-lation Gemini and in 1918 in Cancer. The ring will beopen to its greatest possible extent in 1914, when itssouthern side will be shown, while in 1928 the northernside of the ring will be shown open at its widest. Theplanet is brightest when in the most easterly part ofTaurus and in Scorpio, when the ring system is widestopen, and least bright when in the last half of Leo andin Aquarius, when the ring appears edgewise (PlateXXXVIII.), and is so thin as to be invisible except withpowerful telescopes. Saturns disk like that of Jupiter is darkest at theedges, and shows a number of belts and markings.The b

 

 

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