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Image from page 136 of "The American instructor, second book. Designed for the common schools in America; containing the elements of the English language; lessons in orthography and reading, and the pronunciation of Walker's critical pronouncing dictionar | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 136 of "The American instructor, second book. Designed for the common schools in America; containing the elements of the English language; lessons in orthography and reading, and the pronunciation of Walker's critical pronouncing dictionar

Identifier: americaninstruct00kell

Title: The American instructor, second book. Designed for the common schools in America; containing the elements of the English language; lessons in orthography and reading, and the pronunciation of Walker's critical pronouncing dictionary ..

Year: 1826 (1820s)

Authors: Kelley, Hall J. (Hall Jackson), 1790-1874

Subjects: Spellers Readers

Publisher: Concord, N.H. : I. Hill

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

vout astronomer is mad ! Young. 9. They are called fixed stars, because they neverappear to move, and are so distant, that, although theorbit of the earth is twice 95 millions, or 190 millions 135 of miles across; and we are consequently ItK. .-.prionsof miles nearer to some stars at one time than we are atanother, yet the stars always appear in the same places. Oh Nature ! all sufficient i over all! Enrich me with a knowledge of thy works ! Snatch me to heaven ; and show thy wonders there ;—■ World beyond world, in infinite extent, Profusely scattered oer the blue immense. Thomson, 45. The distance of the nearest of the fixed stars fromthe earth is estimated to be not less than many thousandmillions of miles, and they are all of them probably asfar distant from each other. They appear to fill infinitespace in vast clusters or systems, and our sun is supposedto be one of that amazing cluster of stars, whose myriadsform that bright cloud or path in the heavens, called theMilky Way.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Twas God who formd the concave sky,And all the shining orbs on high :Who gave the various beings birthThat people all the spacious earth.Tis he that bids the tempest rise,And rolls the thunder through the skies.His voice the elements obey :Thro all the earth extends his sway;His goodness all his creatures share:But man is his peculiar care.—Then, while they all proclaim his praise,Let man his voice the loudest raise. 136 I 2 3 4 1 2 I 2 blade, man, hall, tar,—me, bed,—time, bid,- TABLE XXX. Ab ste mi ousa gree a blean te ri ouras sign a bleau re li abi tu mi nouscal ca re ouscen so ri ouscir cu i touscol lo qui alcom mo di ouscon cei va blecon cu pi scencecon ta gi ouscour a ge ouscu ta ne ousde ci sive lyde du ci blede fi na blede si ra blee gre gi ouser ro ne ouse the re alex tra ne ousfor tu i tousgra tu i tousgre ga ri ousliar mo ni ousiin me di ateim pla ca ble im pu ta blein cu ra blein ju ri ousin qui e tudein scru ta blein tu i tiveme lo di ousmys te ri ousne fa ri ousob

 

 

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