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Image from page 322 of "Ridpath's history of the world; being an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social conditions and present promise of the principal families of men .." (1897) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 322 of "Ridpath's history of the world; being an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social conditions and present promise of the principal families of men .." (1897)

Identifier: ridpathshistoryo01ridp

Title: Ridpath's history of the world; being an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social conditions and present promise of the principal families of men ..

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900

Subjects: World history Ethnology

Publisher: New York, Merrill & Baker

Contributing Library: Mugar Memorial Library, Boston University

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

ws: Of theseanimals, there is a third specieswhich are called uri. They arein size only a little inferior tothe elephants; in color and ap-pearance and form they are bulls.(rreat is their strength and great theirvelocity. Nor do they stand in dreadof either man or beast. The inhabit-ants take and slay them by skillfulcontrivance and pitfalls. The tradi-tion of the urus is also preserved in theXiebelungen. The species has beenlike the aurochs, especially persistent,and has only given way before the in-vincible pressure of civilization. It issaid that wandering groups of uri were known in Germany as late as the six-teenth century, and there is little doubtthat the wild bulls which ran at large inthe neighborhood of London as late asthe twelfth century were identical, atleast in descent, with the uri of the Con-tinent. Nor would it be possible to sayto what extent the blood of the extinctanimal courses in the various breeds ofcattle at the present time. Thus we see that while some of the

 

Text Appearing After Image:

THE IRISH ELK (.MEGACEROS HIBERNICUS). prehistoric animals above enumeratedare indubitably extinct, others have insome sense transmitted someprehis-themselves into the historic suSveSSingera. The mammoth and species,the hairy rhinoceros long since ceasedto exist in the countries which we arenow considering. But the cave bear,not unlike the grizzly of the Yubamountains, has doubtless left reducedvarieties of himself to the present time.vSo also the reindeer, and, as we have 300 GREAT RACES OF MANKIND. just seen, the aurochs and the primitiveox. This is to say that if we look atthe current of prehistoric animal life inWestern Europe, and consider it as ariver flowing over a plain and dividinginto multifarious streams as it flows, weshall see some of these streams sinkinganon into the sand and disappearingforever, while others maintain for awhile a straggling and reduced volumeuntil the) in turn disappear. A fewcurrents flow still further and are foundprecariously wandering on the surfac

  

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Taken circa 1897