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Image from page 589 of "Man upon the sea : or, a history of maritime adventure, exploration, and discovery, from the earliest ages to the present time ..." (1858) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 589 of "Man upon the sea : or, a history of maritime adventure, exploration, and discovery, from the earliest ages to the present time ..." (1858)

Identifier: manuponseaorhist00good

Title: Man upon the sea : or, a history of maritime adventure, exploration, and discovery, from the earliest ages to the present time ...

Year: 1858 (1850s)

Authors: Goodrich, Frank B. (Frank Boott), 1826-1894

Subjects: Discoveries in geography Voyages and travels

Publisher: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott & co.

Contributing Library: Boston Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

erged electric cable was made underthe auspices of the New York, Newfoundland, and London Tele-graph Company, assisted by vessels furnished by the Govern-ments of Great Britain and the United States. Of this under-taking—unsuccessful as it was, and fresh as it is in the minds ofall—our account will properly be brief. The idea was first con-ceived in the year 1853, in America, and was earnestly pursuedin defiance of all obstacles,—Cyrus H. Field, Esq., Vice-Presidentof the Company, being one of its most zealous and indefatigablechampions. Surveys and deep-sea explorations, made by Cap-tain Berry man, U.S.N., in the Dolphin and Arctic, in 1853 and1856, resulted in the discovery of a submarine ledge or prairie,at a depth varying from two to two and a half miles, extending - We have to acknowledge our indebtedness to Messrs. Childs & Peterson,the publishers of Dr. Kanes narrative, for the use of the spirited engravingswhich thus far illustrate this chapter. 542 MAN UPON THE SEA.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

HAULING THE CABLE ASHORE. from Cape Race, in Newfoundland, to Cape Clear, in Ireland.This tract received the name of the Telegraphic Plateau.Lieutenant Maury, of the National Observatory, inferred, fromobservations made in the Atlantic during a long series of years,that both sea and air would be in the most favorable conditionfor laying the wire between the 20th of July and the 10th ofAugust. The telegraphic fleet consisted of the U.S. steam-frigate Niagara, Captain Hudson, to lay the first half of thecable from Valentia Bay, in Ireland, of H.B.M. steamer Aga-memnon, to lay the second half of the cable, and of six otherauxiliary steamers of both nations. The Niagara commenced shipping the cable from the factoryat Birkenhead, near Liverpool, late in June, and completed thework in somewhat less than a month. The share of each of thetwo vessels was twelve hundred and fifty miles of wire,—thewire itself being an elaborate combination of fine copper strandsand gutta-percha coatings. The

 

 

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