Image from page 89 of "The everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads,

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    Identifier: everydaycookreci00neil
    Title: The everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmalades, etc., together with various miscellaneous recipes for preparation of food and attention to invalids, all carefully prepared and practically tested
    Year: 1891 (1890s)
    Authors: Neil, E
    Subjects: Cookery Home economics Care of the sick cbk
    Publisher: New York : J.S. Ogilvie
    Contributing Library: Internet Archive
    Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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    Text Appearing Before Image:
    nions, minced fine, and halftheir quantity of green sage-leaves, minced also, a large tea-cupful of grated bread-crumbs, a piece of butter the size ofa walnut, and the beaten yolks of two eggs, with a littlepepper and salt. Mix the whole together, and incorporatethem well. Put the stuffing into the goose, and press it inhard; but do not entirely fill up the cavity, as the mixturewill swell in cooking. Tie the goose securely round with agreased or wetted string; and paper the breast to preventit from scorching. The fire must be brisk and well kept up.It will require from two hours to two and a half to roast.Baste it at first with a little salt and water, and then withits own gravy. Take off the paper when the goose is abouthalf done, and dredge it with a little flour towards the last.Having parboiled the liver and heart, chop them and putthem into the gravy, which must be skimmed well andthickened with a little brown flour. Send apple sauce to table with the goose; also mashedpotatoes.

    Text Appearing After Image:
    Boiled Rabbit POULTRY & GAM£ THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 85 A goo/3e may be stuffed entirely with potatoes, boiled andmashed with milk, butter, pepper and salt. You may make a gravy of the giblets, that is the neck,pinions, iiver, heart and gizzard, stewed in a little water,thickened with butter, rolled in flour, and seasoned withpepper and salt. Before you send it to table, take out allbut the liver and heart; mince them and leave them in thegravy. This gravy is by many preferred to that which comesfrom the goose in roasting. It is well to have both. If a goose is old it is useless to cook it, as when hard andtough it cannot be eaten. ROAST DUCKS. Wash and dry the ducks carefully. Make a stuffing ofsage and onion; insert, and sew up completely that theseasoning may not escape. If tender, ducks do not re-quire more than an hour to roast. Keep them well basted,and a few minutes before serving, dredge lightly withflour, to make them froth and look plump. Send to tablehot, with a good b

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