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Image from page 235 of "American spiders and their spinningwork. A natural history of the orbweaving spiders of the United States, with special regard to their industry and habits" (1889) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 235 of "American spiders and their spinningwork. A natural history of the orbweaving spiders of the United States, with special regard to their industry and habits" (1889)

Identifier: americanspiderst188901mcco

Title: American spiders and their spinningwork. A natural history of the orbweaving spiders of the United States, with special regard to their industry and habits

Year: 1889 (1880s)

Authors: McCook, Henry C. (Henry Christopher), 1837-1911

Subjects: Spiders -- United States

Publisher: [Philadelphia] author, Academy of natural Sciences of Philadelphia

Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

A rudimentary snare of Epeira. Modifiedby Site. 230 AMERICAN SPIDERS AND THEIR SPINNINGWOKK. Again, it is obvious that in cases where an Orbweaver is dependent uponthe wind to carry her foundation lines from the starting point to a pointof attachment, the length of that line will necessarily be doter- Modifiedby Wind. mined by circumstances. The cord may float off a goodly dis-tance before striking an object, or may entangle soon. In thelatter case, as the foundation line will be limited, the snare will be dimin-ished accordingly. I have knowTi a Furrow spider to make a web afoot wide one night, and the next night, when becalmed and preventedfrom stretching a foundation in her old site, spin an orb four inches indiameter. Young spiders make small webs, and invariably very perfect ones. Theirregular, abridged, or patched snares which one sometimes sees, when not

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fli_:. 217. Typical orbwcbs, Epeira strix. the result of wear and tear, are those of adults; never, I believe, of youngOrb weavers. The following are a few measurements of the orbs of some of our com-mon species. Epeira insularis: inches, six by six; thirteen by eleven; four-teen by fourteen; twenty by fourteen; fourteen by fourteen. Epeira strix:two by one and one-half; twelve by eight; nine and seven-eighths by nineand one-half. These are measurements of the orb alone, not including thefoundation spaces. It will be seen that only a part of the above orbs arenearly circular; more frequently, perhaps, they are somewhat elliptical, thevertical diameter being the longer. The central .space occupies about one-third or from one-third to one-fourth of the orb, the .spiral space on eitherside about equaling it in width. The hub approximates the geographical STRENGTH OF WEBS AND POWER OF SPIDERS. 231 centre when the web is quite round, but otherwise is elevated above thecentre; sometimes is

 

 

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