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Image from page 644 of "The history of the Reformation of the Church of England; with the collection of records, and a copious index;" (1839) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 644 of "The history of the Reformation of the Church of England; with the collection of records, and a copious index;" (1839)

Identifier: historyofreforma02burnuoft

Title: The history of the Reformation of the Church of England; with the collection of records, and a copious index;

Year: 1839 (1830s)

Authors: Burnet, Gilbert, 1643-1715 Nares, Edward, 1762-1841

Subjects: Reformation England -- Ecclesiastical history

Publisher: London, Scott

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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n thought on. Whether others had the offer ofit before him or not, I cannot tell :* but he was writ toby Sir Nicholas Bacon on the 9th of December, to comeup to London ; and afterwards, on the 30th of Decem-ber, by Sir William Cecil; and again by Sir NicholasBacon, on the 4th of January. He understood, that itwas for some high preferment; and being a man of ahumble temper, distrustful of himself, that loved privacy,arid was much disabled by sickness, he declined comingup all he could : he begged he might not be thoughtof for any public employment, but that some prebendmight be assigned him, where he might be free both ofcare and government; since the infirmities which hehad contracted by his flying about in the nights in QueenMarys time, had disabled him from a more public sta-tion. That to which he pretended, shews how mode- *Itis said to have been offered to Wotton, dean of Canterbury and York; amost able statesman and diplomatist, but not fit for the Primacy at so critical amoment.

 

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K.Graves frrnlp. IPAl&BOllR, PART II. BOOK III. 587 rate his desires were : for he professed, an employmentof twenty nobles a year would be more acceptable tohim than one of 200/. He had been chaplain to QueenAnne Boleyn, and had received a special charge fromher, a little before she died, to look well to the instruc-tion of her daughter in the principles of the Christianreligion; and now the Queen had a grateful remem-brance of those services. This,* joined with the highesteem that Sir Nicholas Bacon had of him, soon madeher resolve to raise him to that great dignity. Andsince such high preferments are generally, if not greedilysought after, yet very willingly undertaken by mostmen; it will be no unfit thing to lay open a modernprecedent, which indeed savours more of the ancientthan the latter times ; for then, instead of that ambitus,which has given such offence to the world in the latterages, it was ordinary for men to fly from the offer ofgreat preferments. Some run away when

  

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Taken circa 1839