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Image from page 126 of "Labor among primitive peoples. Showing the development of the obstetric science of to-day, from the natural and instinctive customs of all races, civilized and savage, past and present" (1882) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 126 of "Labor among primitive peoples. Showing the development of the obstetric science of to-day, from the natural and instinctive customs of all races, civilized and savage, past and present" (1882)

Identifier: laboramongprimit1882enge

Title: Labor among primitive peoples. Showing the development of the obstetric science of to-day, from the natural and instinctive customs of all races, civilized and savage, past and present

Year: 1882 (1880s)

Authors: Engelmann, George J. (George Julius), 1847-1903

Subjects: Obstetrics Obstetrics

Publisher: St. Louis, J.H. Chambers & Co.

Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

ans a cup of corngruel, atole.^ is regularly given after the expulsion of the child.Among those who retain the semi-recumbent position in whichthey are usually delivered are the Wacos, Hoopas, lower THE rilIRD STAGE. 101 Klamath, and Peuimonce. This is a convenience for themidwife or assistant, as she can also assume a more comfort-able position, and knead the abdomen to better purpose. The Indians of the Pacific coast follow the same custom,and they, as well as all other tribes, seem anxious to attemptthe speedy expulsion of the placenta, so that an effort is alwaysmade to assist the uterus in casting off the icmaining after-birth as soon as the child has been removed, and placed in asafe place. The accoucheur makes gentle, but tolerably firmtraction on the cOrd wdth one hand, and with the other manip-ulates the abdomen over the uterine globe. At the same time,if thought necessary, the assistant will gently press the abdo-men ; both hands, with the distended fingers, being laid above

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 43.—Blanual expression of the placenta, Penimonee Indians. the womb. At times, he does still more by kneading, with aview to pressing the secundines out of the uterine cavity, butif these efforts fail while the patient is in their usual obstetricposition, the semi-recumbent, she is raised to an erect position,and then, well supported, the manipulations of the uterineglobe are continued, and a more firm traction is made uponthe cord. Of the Flat-heads and Pend-oreilles, I am told that theplacenta, in almost every case, is delivered with neither mass-age nor expression nor traction on the cord, nature, unaided,completing the labor; very decided means are, however,resorted to in case delay should occur, which is very rare.Among those who assume the semi-recumbent position arealso the Utes, l^avajoes. Apaches, and some of the Nez-Perces, 102 LABOR: AN ETHNOLOGICAL STUDY. who assist nature by kneading the abdomen, but rarely byactual expression or traction upon the cord; they, howev

 

 

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