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Image from page 136 of "The story of the greatest nations, from the dawn of history to the twentieth century : a comprehensive history, founded upon the leading authorities, including a complete chronology of the world, and a pronouncing vocabulary of eac | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 136 of "The story of the greatest nations, from the dawn of history to the twentieth century : a comprehensive history, founded upon the leading authorities, including a complete chronology of the world, and a pronouncing vocabulary of eac

Identifier: storyofgreatestn02elli

Title: The story of the greatest nations, from the dawn of history to the twentieth century : a comprehensive history, founded upon the leading authorities, including a complete chronology of the world, and a pronouncing vocabulary of each nation

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors: Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840-1916 Horne, Charles F. (Charles Francis), 1870-1942

Subjects: World history

Publisher: New York : F.R. Niglutsch

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

 

 

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endlesstramping and fighting, and so homesick that when it reached the southernboundary of the Punjaub, it refused to go any farther. The king could nothelp himself, and, after erecting twelve immense altars, on the banks of theriver, to mark the limit of his conquests, he gave the order to march homeward.Arriving at the newly founded cities of Nicasa and Bucephala, he separated thearmy into three divisions, two of which were ordered to pass down the river onopposite banks, while Alexander himself with eight thousand men embarked ona fleet, which had been built with a view of descending the Indus to its mouth. Setting out in the latter part of November, B.C. 327, several months wereoccupied, during which there was considerable fighting with the natives. Al-exander never had a narrower escape than in the storming of a town standingon the present site of Mooltan. A ladder was placed against the wall, and hewas the first to run to the top. He was closely followed by four of his officers,

 

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Greece—Alexanders Plans of Empire 251 but as the fifth placed his foot on the ground the ladder broke and the kingwas left on the wall, a fair target for the missiles of the enemy. If he stoodstill but for a minute, he was certain to be killed; he must either leap downamong his own friends or among his enemies. He chose the latter desperatealternative, and, dropping on his feet, placed his back against the wall andfaced the clamoring mob who fought among themselves to get to him. Twochiefs who ventured within reach of his sword were killed, but an arrow piercedhis corselet, and, overcome with weakness, he sank to the ground. Two of theofficers who had followed him fought off their assailants until the arrival ofmore soldiers, who had scaled the walls and opened the gates. The place wasquickly taken and every defender put to the sword. Having reached the ocean, Alexander ordered Nearchus, the commander ofthe fleet, to sail to the Persian Gulf, while he pushed inland with a division o

 

 

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