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Image from page 450 of "The Maclise portrait-gallery of "illustrious literary characters", with memoirs biographical, critical, bibliographical & anecdotal, illustrative of the literature of the former half of the present century" (1883) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 450 of "The Maclise portrait-gallery of "illustrious literary characters", with memoirs biographical, critical, bibliographical & anecdotal, illustrative of the literature of the former half of the present century" (1883)

Identifier: macliseportraitg00macl

Title: The Maclise portrait-gallery of "illustrious literary characters", with memoirs biographical, critical, bibliographical & anecdotal, illustrative of the literature of the former half of the present century

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors: Maclise, Daniel, 1806-1870 Bates, William, d. 1884

Subjects: Authors Authors, English Journalists

Publisher: London : Chatto and Windus

Contributing Library: The Centre for 19th Century French Studies - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

 

 

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e delightsof my own boyhood,—he says Wallace is drawn as a sort of sentimentaldandy, who faints upon occasion, is revived by lavender-water, andthroughout the book is tenderly in love. To the Pastors Fi?-eside, whichmet with less success, he is willing to concede some good passages. Hefurther commemorates Miss Porter as a philosophical or ethical writer,in respect of her collection of the aphorisms of Sir Philip Sydney, andher contributions to Eraser. In private, he concludes, she is a quietand good-humoured lady, rather pious, and fond of going to eveningparties, where she generally contrives to be seen patronizing some suckinglion or lioness,—in which occupation may she long continue, devotingher mornings to the Prayer-book, and her evenings to the conversazione—And may no ill event cut shorterThe easy course of Miss Jane Porter. * For some interesting remarks upon Sir Robert Ker Porter as an art-student,reference maybe made to the Somerset House Gazette, 1824, vol. i. p. 304.

 

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ArT>ioiii OF O Do::?^NE i^ LADY MORGAX. 313 The Doctors obsecration, in this concluding distich, was not un-heard ; but still;,—7iec -pietas 7noram,—wrinkles and old age came on atlast, in spite of all. S. C. Hall records a visit to her at Bristol, in herbrothers house, when she was but the shadow of her former self, andcould not rise from her couch without assistance. Yet she had still,he says, the grace and dignity that appertain to honoured old age, andwas still beautiful,—still the same gentle, holy-minded woman she hadever been, bending with Christian faith to the will of the Almighty—biding her time. The time presently came ; she continued to resideto the end with her brother ; and at his house, Portland Square, Bristol,she died May 24th, 1850, in the seventh-fifth year of her age. Dr. Porter,himself, the last survivor,—unless the daughter of Sir. R. K. Porter, whowas married in Russia, is still alive, or has left issue,—of this clever anddistinguished family, fol

 

 

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