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Image from page 440 of "London labour and the London poor; a cyclopædia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work" (1861) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 440 of "London labour and the London poor; a cyclopædia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work" (1861)

Identifier: londonlabourlond03mayh

Title: London labour and the London poor; a cyclopædia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors: Mayhew, Henry, 1812-1887 Tuckniss, William

Subjects: Working class Crime Prostitution Poor Charities

Publisher: London : Griffin, Bohn, and Company

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

her cheekswere full of colour, and her lips very thick.This was accotmted for. She told me thather father was a mulatto from Philadelphia.She was short, and dressed in a torn old cot-ton gown, the pattern of which was hardlydiscernible from wear. A kind of half-shawl,patched and mended in several places, and ofverj- thin woollen texture, was pinned aroundher neck; her arms, which, with her hands,were full and large, Avere bare. She wore verj^old broken boots and ragged stockings. Herdemeanour was modest. I am now eighteen, she stated. Myfather was a colom-ed man. He came overhere as a sailor, I have heard, but I neversaw him; for my mother, who was a whitewoman, was not manied to him, but met himat Oxford ; and she married afteiwards a box-maker, a white man, and has two other chil-dren. They are living, I believe, but I dontknow where they are. I have heard my mo-ther say that my father—tliats my ownfather—had become a missionary, and hadbeen sent out to America from England as a

 

Text Appearing After Image:

VAGRANT FROM THE REFUGE IN PLAYHOUSEYARD, CRIPPLEGATE. [From a Photograph.} LONDON LAEOUB AND THE LONDON POOR. 3&.5 missionary, by Mr. , I believe that was fifteen years ago. I dont know who Mr. was, but he was a gentleman, Ive heard my mother say. She told me, too, thatmy father was a good scholar, and that hecould speak seven different languages, andv,-as a very rehgious man. He was sent outto Boston, but I never heard Avhether he wasto stay or not, and I dont know what he wasto missiouaiy about. He behaved very wellto my mother, I have heard her say, until shetook up ^ith the other man (the box-maker),and then he left her, and gave her up, andcame to London. It was at Oxford that theyall three were then; and when my father gotaway, or came away to London, my motherfollowed him (she told me so, but she didntlike to talk about it), as she was then in thefamily way. She dlilnt find him; but myfather heai-d of her, and left some money with Mr. for her, and she got into Poland-sti-e

 

 

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