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Image from page 131 of "The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment" (1911) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 131 of "The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment" (1911)

Identifier: newbookofdogcomp01leig

Title: The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Leighton, Robert, 1859-1934

Subjects: Dogs

Publisher: London New York : Cassell

Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine

Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

is less sub-ject to rheumatism than many. His heavybuild, powerful limbs, thick, short neck,heavy shoulders, and thick skin are character-istics of all animals inhabiting mountainouscountries, and there is a rugged grandeurabout him comparable with that of theScottish Deerhound and the Otterhound,from which he may be a cross. In The Sportsmans Cabinet, 1803, thereis an illustration of an English Sheepdogwhich would pass for the Highland Collie,and one is tempted to believe that thereis some relationship between the two.Peeblesshire is regarded as the true homeof the Beardie, and Sir Walter Thorburnand other patrons of the breed have forlong contributed prizes at the annualpastoral show in that county for the bestbearded dogs owned by shepherds. Asone who has had the honour of judgingat this fixture, I can say that better filledclasses cannot be found anywhere. In thestandard adopted for judging the breed,many points are given for good legs andfeet, bone, body, and coat, while head and

 

Text Appearing After Image:

LORD ARTHUR CECILS BEARDED COLLIE BEN.Photograph by C. Rod, Wishaw. THE COLLIE. 103 ears are not of great importance. Move-ment, size, and general appearance havemuch weight. The colour is varied in thisbreed. Cream-coloured specimens are notuncommon, and snow white with orange orblack markings may often be seen, but thepopular colour is grizzly grey. Unfortu-nately the coats of many are far too softand the undercoat is frequently absent. become frequent fixtures among shepherdsand farmers within recent years. The modeof arranging these competitions is this :—Three sheep are let out of a large bughtor pen in the south of the field, the dogand his master are standing about thenorth of the field ; the dog has to bringthe sheep up the east side, round a smallpen at the north end, drive them down I *j 1 B 4ft^^ - ^WM»> MR. SIMON RUTHERFORDS JIM WEARING THE SINGLE SHEEP,AT WHICH WORK HE IS AN ARTIST.Photograph by Murray, Hawick. It has been said that the Beardie is noteasily induced

 

 

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