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iPod Shuffle2 - No UFOs | by @HotpixUK -Add Me On Ipernity 500px
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iPod Shuffle2 - No UFOs

Model 500 - No UFOs - Play this track here.

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

About time I featured a slab of Detroit Techno here.

 

Model 500 & Infiniti were names used by Juan Atkins. He is widely credited as the originator of techno music, specifically Detroit techno along with Derrick May and Kevin Saunderson. The three, sometimes called the Belleville Three, attended high school together in Belleville, Michigan, near Detroit.

 

At age sixteen, Atkins heard electronic music for the first time, which would prove to be a life-changing experience. In late-1990s interviews, he recalls the sound of synthesizers as being like "UFOs landing." He soon had his first synthesizer and abandoned playing funk bass.

 

“ When I first heard synthesizers dropped on records it was great… like UFOs landing on records, so I got one.

…It wasn’t any one particular group that turned me on to synthesizers, but 'Flashlight' (Parliament's number one R & B hit from early 1978) was the first record I heard where maybe 75 percent of the production was electronic."

 

The first publicized UFO sightings were usually referred to using the term mystery airships, which were commonly seen and described as such during the latter part of the 19th century and the early 20th.

 

The term foo fighters was used by American fighter pilots during World War II to refer to UFOs.

 

The first widely publicized U.S. sighting, reported by private pilot Kenneth Arnold in June 1947, gave rise to the popular terms "flying saucer" and "flying disc", of which the former is still sometimes used, even though Arnold said the most of the objects he saw were not totally circular and one was crescent-shaped (see Kenneth Arnold UFO sighting for details). In addition, the infamous Roswell UFO Incident occurred at about the same time, which only served to further fuel public interest in the topic.

 

The term "UFO" was first suggested in 1952 by Cpt. Edward J. Ruppelt, who headed Project Blue Book, then the USAF's official investigation of UFOs. Ruppelt felt that "flying saucer" did not reflect the diversity of the sightings. He suggested that UFO should be pronounced as a word – you-foe. However it is now usually pronounced by forming each letter: U.F.O. His term was quickly adopted by the United States Air Force, which also briefly used "UFOB". The Air Force initially defined UFOs as those objects that remain unidentified after scrutiny by expert investigators, though today the term UFO is often used for any unexplained sighting regardless of whether it has been investigated.

 

Because the term UFO is ambiguous – referring either to any unidentified sighting, or in popular usage to alien spacecraft – and the public and media ridicule sometimes associated with the topic, some investigators now prefer to use other terms such as unidentified aerial phenomenon (or UAP).

 

For trivia buffs, the equivalent acronym for UFO in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and Italian is OVNI (Objeto Volador No Identificado, Objeto Voador Não Identificado, Objet volant non identifié or Oggetto Volante Non Identificato).

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

Checkout more scenes from the city from my photostream.

 

Keep in touch, add me as a contact www.flickr.com/relationship.gne?id=33062170@N08 so I can follow all your new uploads.

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

(c) Hotpix / HotpixUK Tony Smith - Hotpix.freeserve.co.uk WDCC

 

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Taken on October 16, 2010