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GOES-11 Satellite Sees Large Hurricane Eugene | by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
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GOES-11 Satellite Sees Large Hurricane Eugene

NASA image captured August 2, 2011

 

This "full disk" image of the eastern Pacific Ocean from the GOES-11 satellite shows Hurricane Eugene (right) off the western Mexican coast on August 2, 2011 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).

 

Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

 

Hurricane Eugene has become a large hurricane in size and strength, and when the GOES-11 satellite captured an image of the eastern Pacific on August 2, Hurricane Eugene was very obvious because of its size.

 

The GOES-11 satellite, operated by NOAA, captured a "full disk" image of the eastern Pacific Ocean and showed Hurricane Eugene off the western Mexican coast on August 2, 2011 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). Although an eye was not visible in the image, Eugene is a category 2 hurricane. Eugene's tropical storm force winds extend out to 140 miles, putting the diameter of the storm at about 280 miles.

 

The NASA GOES Project created the full-disk image from GOES-11, that gives a great perspective of how large a hurricane can be on the face of the earth. The NASA GOES Project is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 2, Eugene's maximum sustained winds were near 100 mph and it could strengthen more. Eugene continues to remain off the western Mexican coast, stirring up rough surf along the western facing beaches. It was located near 14.0 North and 109.6 West, and moving to the west-northwest near 15 mph.

 

Eugene is expected to continue tracking in a west-northwest direction and not affect any land areas.

 

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Uploaded on August 2, 2011