Hinode Observes 2011 Annular Solar Eclipse [Video]

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Post YOUR images of the 2012 annular solar eclipse in our Flickr group: www.flickr.com/groups/2012annulareclipse/

On Sunday, May 20th, the Moon will pass in front of the sun, transforming sunbeams across the Pacific side of Earth into fat crescents and thin rings of light.

It's an annular solar eclipse, in which the Moon will cover as much as 94% of the sun. Hundreds of millions of people will be able to witness the event. The eclipse zone stretches from southeast Asia across the Pacific Ocean to western parts of North America.

In the United States, the eclipse begins around 5:30 pm PDT. For the next two hours, a Moon-shaped portion of the sun will go into hiding. Greatest coverage occurs around 6:30 pm PDT.

Because some of the sun is always exposed during the eclipse, ambient daylight won't seem much different than usual. Instead, the event will reveal itself in the shadows. Look on the ground beneath leafy trees for crescent-shaped sunbeams and rings of light.

Near the center-line of the eclipse, observers will experience something special: the "ring of fire." As the Moon crosses the sun dead-center, a circular strip or annulus of sunlight will completely surround the dark lunar disk. Visually, the sun has a big black hole in the middle.

The "path of annularity" where this occurs is only about 200 miles wide, but it stretches almost halfway around the world passing many population centers en route: Tokyo, Japan; Medford, Oregon; Chico, California; Reno, Nevada; Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Lubbock, Texas. In those locations the ring of fire phenomenon will be visible for as much as 4 and a half minutes.

To read more go to: science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2012/15may_...

To watch a video about the 2012 annular solar eclipse go to: www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YX2blo1eRk

Credit: NASA

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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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Original Caption:

January 6, 2010

Caption: This timelapse video shows Hinode's view of the eclipse.

To see a still image from this event go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/5333202438

On January 4, the Hinode satellite captured these breathtaking images of an annular solar eclipse. An annular eclipse occurs when the moon, slightly more distant from Earth than on average, moves directly between Earth and the sun, thus appearing slightly smaller to observers' eyes; the effect is a bright ring, or annulus of sunlight, around the silhouette of the moon. Hinode, a Japanese mission in partnership with NASA, NAOJ, STFC, ESA, and NSC, currently in Earth orbit, is studying the Sun to improve our understanding of the mechanisms that power the solar atmosphere and drive solar eruptions.

Hinode, launched in September 2006, uses three advanced optical instruments to further our understanding of the solar atmosphere and turbulent solar eruptions that can impact hardware in orbit and life on Earth.

Image credit: Hinode/XRT

To download this video go here: www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?collectio...

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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lonely_goof69, arkadia libre, and 57 other people added this video to their favorites.

  1. fnanfne 40 months ago | reply

    Awe inspiring! Why does the sun seem so placid? Not a single change of surface features for the whole eclipse, strange.

  2. Lights In The Dark 40 months ago | reply

    I think the transit may have happened too quickly to see any activity on the Sun. Most solar videos use much longer intervals between frames to show action.

  3. Lukas Agudelo 40 months ago | reply

    Muy corto en video! Pero esta cool!

  4. osuruno 40 months ago | reply

    Por que no hay movimiento en el sol? siempre hay tormentas y llamaradas y explosiones, y aqui parece una foto

  5. dodagp 23 months ago | reply

    Beyond words !!!!

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