White Rim Canyons

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    White Rim Canyons. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. April 6, 2012. © Copyright 2012 G Dan Mitchell - all rights reserved.

    Rugged canyon and plateau landscape of the White Rim area, photographed from Grand View, Canyonlands National Park.

    I made this photograph on a day when we visited the "sky island" section of Canyonlands National Park, a high plateau fronted on many sides by steep cliffs and giant drop-offs. Since this was my first time in Canyonlands, I had a lot of reconnaissance to do before my planned evening shoot. We drove around sections of this part of the park, pausing at many overlooks to enjoy the view and consider the potential evening views. At one point we stopped at an overlook near the southern end of this section of the park to look and photograph.

    The area in the photograph is the "white rim" area, where whitish colored rocks form a sort of tough terrace into which creeks have begun to carve canyons. The scale of the formations is tremendous, and the fact that two mighty rivers, the Colorado and the Green meet not too far from this point. This photograph was made well before the "ideal" golden hour time, but the low and slanting side-light and the rugged terrain of canyons and buttes seemed to compensate for that.

    G Dan Mitchell is a California photographer whose subjects include the Pacific coast, redwood forests, central California oak/grasslands, the Sierra Nevada, California deserts, urban landscapes, night photography, and more.
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    Text, photographs, and other media are © Copyright G Dan Mitchell (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from G Dan Mitchell.

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