Ignoring the check in the end here, it's a very smooth, flat cut. It's not usably smooth. It'll require planing and sanding, but it's a flat surface overall. The blade and saw give an okay first pass for me. I can take it from here.


I'll note that this was a test, and an example of straight sawing, wherein you simply cut parallel cuts across the whole width of the log, and the ends like this aren't really used, though there's still another slice or two in a piece this thick. What I'll be doing mostly is quartersawing. This is where you first cut the log in half longitudinally, then each of those in half, so you have 4 cheese wedge shapes. Then you saw the face off one side, flip it and saw off the next face, and keep going back and forth until you have tiny, useless pieces. You might be able to use them for small turnings.


Pieces sawn in this way have the growth rings running perpendicularly through their faces. They're less prone to warping, and have very consistent looking grain. I'll still flat saw from time to time of course, for the look, or just to get more out of a log.

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Taken on June 14, 2009