euthman · Albums

Human Ovary with Fully Developed Corpus Luteum

Pilomatricoma Leiomyoma Squamous carcinoma of the cervix Carotid Plaque Partial Hydatidiform Mole Gastric Adenocarcinoma Gastric Adenocarcinoma Gastric Adenocarcinoma Burkitt lymphoma, H&E Burkitt lymphoma, H&E Burkitt lymphoma, touch prep, Wright stain Infectious Mononucleosis Infectious Mononucleosis Infectious Mononucleosis Verrucous Carcinoma 1 Verrucous Carcinoma 2 Verrucous Carcinoma 7 Verrucous Carcinoma 6 Verrucous Carcinoma 5 Verrucous Carcinoma 4

Gross and microscopic images of pathology specimens. All should have Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licenses. Please let me know if you find one that I have not licensed, and I'll correct the oversight.

If you have specimen photos of your own, please join and contribute to the Pathology and Lab Medicine Group on Flickr.


Publishers: Please credit any photos you use to "Ed Uthman, MD"

I have been asked about the technique I use for photomicrography. I take all my photomics, handheld, with an old Nikon Coolpix 995. The other Nikon Coolpix models that can be used in this way are the 900, 950, 990, and 4500. All are out of production but can be acquired inexpensively on the secondary market.

White balance: Preset to empty "white" microscope field.
Shooting mode: M (manual), Landscape (fixed focus at infinity).
Exposure: +0.7 stop compensation for routine brightfield; or -1.0 for use with polarizers/compensator.
Image quality: Fine (JPEG).

Shooting technique:

1) Bring subject into perfect focus in the eyepiece, with your own eyes adapted for distance vision. This is not an issue for people over forty years of age--their eyes do not try to "fight" the microscope's focus--but the infinity focusing technique can be learned by younger photographers. Just imagine yourself looking at a ship on the horizon as you peer through the eyepiece. Eventually you'll get it. Wear whatever corrective lenses you normally wear for distance vision. If you wear conventional or progressive bifocals, peer through the part of the lens you use for distant subjects.

2) Hold the camera solidly up against the microscope eyepiece, using the camera lens housing to brace it.

3) Make sure the zoom is set to maximum "wide"

4) Center the image in the LCD screen

5) Gently squeeze the shutter, taking care not to move the camera in respect to the microscope eyepiece.

For post-processing, I use the free Google application, Picasa. I generally go through these steps:

1) In the "Basic Fixes" tab, crop the image as needed

2) In the "Tuning" tab, select the "neutral color picker" and click on a white part of the background to refine the white balance.

3) Use the "Highlights" slider with the histogram to take the background (which will be light gray after step #2) up to full white, but being careful not to wash out details in the tissue.

4) (Optional) Use the "Shadows" slider with the histogram to enhance the overall contrast by darkening the darkest areas of the image.

Resist the urge to use the Effects-->Sharpen command in Picasa. It almost always makes the image worse. If the focus is too soft, you will simply have to reshoot it. If you have trouble getting a sharp image, consider bracketing your exposures over a range of focusings as a routine.

967 photos | 47,924 views



Comments on this set

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Cytosue says:

I love your set of specimens! You have so many great photos with such fantastic detail. Very impressive!
Posted 99 months ago. ( permalink )

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gloriacenteno says:

I´m a pathologist and embryology teacher in buenos aires, argentina. I´m pleased to see this pictures!
Posted 83 months ago. ( permalink )

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Niels_Olson says:

Dear Dr Uthman,

these are some truly incredible photos. Just a minor point: I'm very glad you put your pictures under a Creative Commons license and did not put them in the public domain. If you had put them in the public domain, you would have given people, particularly large companies, like textbook publishers, a route to take your work and claim it as their own. There have even been cases of the thieves then turning around and suing the creator! It all comes out of a problem known as the tragedy of the commons. To avoid potential claims of ambiguity in the future, you may want to replace "place all my specimen photos in the PUBLIC DOMAIN" with something like "make all my specimen photos available to people to use, free of unnecessary restrictions. I only ask you credit me and share alike"
Posted 82 months ago. ( permalink )

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euthman says:

Thanks, Niels! I have changed the Set caption accordingly.
Posted 82 months ago. ( permalink )

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KayVee.INC says:

Wow. Thank you for sharing these photos. They're absolutely brilliant.

Thanks again.
Posted 80 months ago. ( permalink )

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lester_stu says:

I suppose I have visited your homepage before. Do you still update it ?
Posted 77 months ago. ( permalink )

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euthman says:

Rarely. Most of my Internet activity these days is scattered among a variety of sites: Flickr, Twitter, Facebook, and various professional mailing lists.
Posted 77 months ago. ( permalink )

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gibi55 says:

Hi Dr Euthman. Which make and model of scope are you using for your pics?. Thank you
Posted 28 months ago. ( permalink )

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euthman says:

Most of the photomicrographs are shot through a Nikon Eclipse E400 with planachromat objectives.
Posted 28 months ago. ( permalink )

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gibi55 says:

Thank you for your answer. I ´m following your directions, but I´m still not satified with the results. I believe in the utility of simple cameras in pathology.
Posted 28 months ago. ( permalink )

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