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White Tigers, Singapore Zoo {Explore} | by Eustaquio Santimano
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White Tigers, Singapore Zoo {Explore}

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White Tigers, Singapore Zoo

 

In the wild, Bengal White Tigers are found exclusively within South Asia, notably in India. Although Bengal tigers make up 60% of the world’s wild tiger population, individuals with white coats are indeed very rare. Only one White Tiger exists out of every 10,000 normal orange-coloured tigers.

 

White Tigers are often mistaken for albinos, which are completely white with pink eyes. The unusual white coloration is a result of gene mutation – a permanent change in the gene controlling the coat coloration and the change can be passed on from one generation to another. The mutated gene is a recessive gene, meaning two such genes are needed to produce the white coloration. Both white and normal orange-coloured cubs can be found in a litter.

 

The majestic tigers are a symbol of strength and power to many. Yet today, their survival hangs in the balance. Of the eight tiger subspecies, three are now extinct and the remaining five are critically endangered.

 

Despite greater awareness and concerted efforts to protect the tiger, their numbers are fast decreasing. Rapid deforestation has resulted in the destruction of the tigers’ habitat as well as the depletion of their prey. Killing of tigers for their body parts is another reason for the decline in their population.

 

A report published by the World Wildlife Fund highlighted the possible extinction of tigers within a decade if inadequate conservation measures are taken to protect the tigers. This means that the majestic big cat might disappear from the face of the Earth within our lifetime!

 

Singapore Zoo

The zoo is a model of the 'open zoo' concept. The animals are kept in spacious, landscaped enclosures, separated from the visitors by either dry or wet moats. The moats are concealed with vegetation or dropped below the line of vision. In the case of dangerous animals which can climb very well, moat barriers are not used. Instead, these animals are housed in landscaped glass-fronted enclosures.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Zoo

 

Also appears on:

blogs.innoveer.com/

 

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Taken on November 20, 2008