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Deutschland : KZ Konzentrationslager Buchenwald : Block 11, 1937 | by (vincent desjardins)
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Deutschland : KZ Konzentrationslager Buchenwald : Block 11, 1937

fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buchenwald

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/KZ_Buchenwald

ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Бухенвальд

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buchenwald

 

Source : Wikipédia

 

Buchenwald concentration camp (German: Konzentrationslager (KZ) Buchenwald, IPA: [ˈbuːxənvalt]) was a Nazi concentration camp established on the Ettersberg (Etter Mountain) near Weimar, Germany, in July 1937, one of the first and the largest of the concentration camps on German soil.

Camp prisoners from all over Europe and Russia—Jews, non-Jewish Poles and Slovenes, religious and political prisoners, Roma and Sinti, Jehovah's Witnesses, criminals, homosexuals, and prisoners of war— worked primarily as forced labor in local armament factories. From 1945 to 1950, the camp was used by the Soviet occupation authorities as an internment camp, known as NKVD special camp number 2.

 

 

1937- 1945 :

According to the same source, the total number of deaths at Buchenwald is estimated at 56,545.

This number is the sum of:

Deaths according to material left behind by SS: 33,462

Executions by shooting: 8,483

Executions by hanging (estimate): 1,100

Deaths during evacuation transports: 13,500

 

NKVD Special camp 2

 

Numbers and casualties

The total number of detainees and deaths is uncertain.

The Soviet Ministry for the Interior released numbers in 1990, according to which 122,671 were detained, 42,889 of whom died primarily due to starvation and diseases, 756 were sentenced to death and executed, 45,261 were released, 12,770 were deported to the Soviet Union for forced labour, the status of 6,680 was changed to prisoner of war, and 14,202 were handed over to the Communist authorities of East Germany after their establishment. Historian v. Flocken says these numbers are too low, and places the number of total detainees at 160,000 to 180,000, 65,000 of whom died. Historians Plato, Mirenko, Niethammer, Jeske, and Finn give estimates of about 154,000 detainees, and say the number of deaths given by the Soviets is realistic.

Among the dead were an estimated 12,000 discovered in 1990 in mass graves near the Sachsenhausen concentration camp. Six thousand of the captives in Sachsenhausen were German officers sent there from Western Allied camps.

 

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Taken on January 10, 2008