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Let There Be LIGHT! | by elycefeliz
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Let There Be LIGHT!

30 Days of Gratitude: Day 5 - I am grateful for electric lights. This time of year, when it's dark when I get up in the morning, and becomes dark so early in the day, I appreciate that I can turn a switch and have light.

 

Earlier this year, most of our city lost power after a storm - there were a lot of things we lost by not having electricity; it seemed that the most difficult was being in the dark.

   

www.wlwt.com/weather/17470496/detail.html

Four Dead, More Than 855,000 Lose Power Due To Wind Storm

As the remnants of Hurricane Ike rolled across the country wreaking havoc, hundreds of thousands of people lost power in the Tri-State. "It's a monumental task ahead," said Duke Energy spokeswoman Kathy Meinke. "Over 90 percent of our customers are without service. Meinke said it was the biggest outage in the company’s history and that it could take up to a week until power is restored in some areas.

 

www.ohio.com/news/break_news/28375784.html

Gusts of wind toppled trees throughout southwestern Ohio, ripped roofs from buildings and temporarily shut down the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

 

Airport officials evacuated the control tower and canceled about 40 flights before air traffic resumed, said airport spokesman Ted Bushelman. He said winds were up to 74 mph.

 

Dispatchers said that strong winds from the storm brought down tree limbs and power lines and caused severe damage.

 

www.wcpo.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=8735734c-29...

Winds gusting at hurricane force left hundreds of thousands of people without power in the Tri-State Sunday.

 

Wind gusts approached 80 mph -- speeds of a Category 1 hurricane. Sustained winds were clocked at 40 mph -- wind speeds of a tropical storm.

 

www.nytimes.com/2008/09/16/us/16midwest.html?_r=1&ref...

Communities across the Midwest were reeling Monday after heavy weekend storms across the region left at least 17 people dead, more than two million homes and businesses without power, and scores of roadways flooded.

 

The storm, which combined remnants of Hurricane Ike with a slow-moving front in a wave of low pressure, produced wind gusts of up to 81 miles per hour, spurred five tornadoes in Michigan and dumped 4 to 10 inches of water on parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan.

 

The storm produced little rain in Ohio, but its sustained winds of more than 40 m.p.h. snapped trees and power lines, leaving 1.9 million customers without power. The storm is also being blamed for five deaths in that state, including that of a woman who died when a tree struck her home, said Tamara McBride, a spokeswoman for the Ohio Emergency Management Agency.

     

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Taken on September 16, 2008