Dur Untash Napirisha

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    Large panoramic view of ancient elamite ziggurat Tchogha Zanbil, made with the combination of 4 images taken in April 2008, province of Khuzestan, Iran.

    This ziggurat has been builded by elamite king Untash-Napirisha, and was originaly called “Dur Untash Napirisha” ( the fortress of Untash-Napirisha), in 1250 BCE. It was a temple dedicated to the cult of Inshushinak, god of the Susiana province, and of other gods of the elamite pantheon such as Napirisha, Ishme-karab, and Kiririsha.

    Being world's best preserved ziggurat, it survived earthquakes and erosion despite being buided with sun dryed mud bricks and a mud/dryed grass mortar named Adobe, still used in Iran for traditional houses building. its architecture is exceptional, consisting in a set of 5 rectangular floors, all around the others, the central one being the highest. the floors were in fact all juxtaposed directly on the soil, instead of being on the other like in all other known ziggurats worldwide. A complex network of drainage the covering of some exposed parts by a waterproof mortar explain why the monument is so well preserved from the rain and didn't collaps within milleniums. remnants of royal tombs, of a city, circular walls, and even a stunning water purification pool system can be seen around. Elamit cuneiform inscriptions are seen on the bricks realizing texts of hundreds meters long that gave archeologist priceless clues for a better understanding of this civilization.

    For the 2 last centuries, scholars considered ziggurats as being the hallmark of Mesopotamia, the others were then supposed to be copies under the influence of mesopotamian art. The story of the babel Tower having probably influenced the scholars. Recent advances in archaeologia proved this idea wrong, as bigger and older ziggurats were found in Pakistan (Mundigak) and in Iran (Konar Sandal). Another ziggurat was attested at Susa, mentioned by the assyrian stela of Assurbanipal found at Niniveh. All those evidences clearly evoke a more eastern origin of the ziggurat, born probably in the east of Iran or in Pakistan.

    Bijan1351, Sagittariuss, MahD, and 11 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. Vahid Rahmanian [deleted] 66 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Age of Empires, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    2. SBA73 66 months ago | reply

      COMPLIMENTI!!!E' UNA FOTO STUPENDA!!!
      THIS SHOT IS WONDERFUL!!!
      ANTICANDO AWARD
      www.flickr.com/groups/anticando/

    3. Nazanin Banani 66 months ago | reply

      I've never seen such shot ! Great one ...

    4. Sagittariuss 66 months ago | reply

      This is a great picture. Thanks for sharing.

    5. IRANIAN ROSE 66 months ago | reply

      I have seen this magnificent placse

    6. Hamzeh Karbasi 66 months ago | reply

      Nice
      Thankssssss

    7. ZhuPix 66 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Ancient Iran, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    8. ZhuPix 66 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Iran - Khuzestan, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    9. SHAD KAR 66 months ago | reply

      Cette Ziggourat n'est pas une partie de la civilisation Perse. Mais dans la territoire de Perse.
      T'as bien voyagé à peu près partout en IRAN, Patrick !
      Bravo

    10. IranMap 66 months ago | reply

      Dear dynamosquito

      Congratulation.

      You are the winner of this week competition.
      By visiting IranMap.com you would see your work as the main banner.

    11. Mehdi Kavousian 66 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called UNESCO's World Heritage in Iran, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    12. nima_m2008 60 months ago | reply

      just lovely, thank you..

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