Immortals

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    2 of the Louvre Museum melophores (immortal persian guard) from the famous glazed bricks friezes found in the apadana (Darius the Great's palace) in Susa (Shush) by archeologist Marcel Dieulafoy and brought in Paris. Such polychromic friezes used to decorate the Achaemenian king's palaces in their capitales of Shush, Ecbatan, and Persepolis. The royal troopers were 10000, any dead being straight away replaced explaining their name of immortals. Only persian and median nobles could access such function. They constitued sections of 1000 soldiers, armed with archs, shields, and lances, each section being commanded by officers named chyliarchs. According to Historian Pierre Briant who opposed the generally admitted idea derived from the greek historian's reports and despite their rich and colorful uniforms, these soldiers were neither a parade army nor some fastuous guard units, but elite fighters that were engaged in most of the battlefields.

    Pavillon Sully at the Louvre museum, Paris, France, July 2008

    Hamzeh Karbasi, bijanafsharirani, and 13 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. Banafsh* 79 months ago | reply

      I don't think so . we used to kill everything then cry for it ...and name them as immortal, martyr..etc...
      Any way ,good shot.

    2. dynamosquito 79 months ago | reply

      Well, the name comes from the ancient greek scholars and not from the persian ;-)

    3. Vahid Rahmanian [deleted] 79 months ago | reply

      Bonjour, je suis l'administrateur du groupe Âge des Empires, et nous aimerions beaucoup que vous ajoutiez ceci à notre groupe !

      You know what? I think during the last 2 centuries you French people liked our ancient heritage more than us Iranians ourselves. And that's both funny and sad.

    4. **El-Len** 79 months ago | reply

      Thank you dynamosquito for the great shot and all the information. You are a true Iran expert - much appreciated by me!

    5. Naseh Andarzgoo 79 months ago | reply

      I wish those in Iran looked like these too... The colors have all faded, you know.... :(
      Thanks for this memorial :)

    6. bijanafsharirani 79 months ago | reply

      thank you
      dear friend

    7. Elmac_ off 79 months ago | reply

      Sì, il passato è ancora presente,
      è evidente nella tua bellissima foto!
      Yes, the past is still present,
      is evident in your beautiful photo!
      Tracce del Passato- Traks of the Past
      post 1, comment 2


      Please add tag: "TP"

    8. Hossein Mosaferi 79 months ago | reply

      I love this part of Louvre. thank you so much for your helpful description. you know, in Louvre everything is written in French and unfortunatly i didn't take and used those headphones. when i saw these bricks in Louvre, I thought they are not original and they are rebuilt. because I have never seen them in color. even in Takht'e Jamshid all of them are simple bricks and stones. I still don't know if they're painted in France or what? do you know?

    9. shagreen* 79 months ago | reply

      thanks for sharing this photo and information.

    10. Nickmard 78 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Achaemenid Empire, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    11. Bijan1351 78 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Khuzestan Province - استان خوزستان, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

    12. koorosh.nozad 74 months ago | reply

      Bonjour, je suis l'administrateur du groupe IMAGES OF OLD IRAN, et nous aimerions beaucoup que vous ajoutiez ceci à notre groupe !

    13. ZiKiarts 42 months ago | reply

      J'adore le blue et le jaune des bricks.

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