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Star Eyes Decide This | by DonkeyHotey
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Star Eyes Decide This

The Roberts Five say, "No, we said we'll uphold the principle of Star Eyes Decide This!"

 

All the Supreme Court Justices claimed in their confirmation hearings that they would uphold the principle of Stare Decisis when making decisions. The current team of Radical Activists on the Supreme Court have their own interpretation of Stare Decisis. The principle is when you disagree with a policy implemented in law you just view that law through special star shaped decoder glasses and the law is revealed to be unconstitutional. This is known as the principle of "Star Eyes Decide This." To paraphrase Dr. Seuss from the The Sneetches, "Right thinking judges have stars upon thars."

 

Wikipedia:Stare Decisis is a legal principle by which judges are obliged to respect the precedents established by prior decisions. The words originate from the phrasing of the principle in the Latin maxim Stare decisis et non quieta movere: "to stand by decisions and not disturb the undisturbed." In a legal context, this is understood to mean that courts should generally abide by precedents and not disturb settled matters.

 

This cartoon is presented on the occasion of the Robert's Court hearing of a case deciding the fate of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Court's decision that jails may perform suspicionless strip searches on new inmates regardless of the gravity of their alleged offenses. The Obama Administration supported the Affordable Care act, but sided with the radicals in support of strip searches for all.

 

Supreme Court of the United States 2011: Left to right. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito.

 

The source images for these caricatures are images in the public domain as follows:Clarence Thomas, John G. Roberts, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy and Samuel Alito.

 

The background is a photo by Carol M. Highsmith available via the Library of Congress.

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Taken on April 5, 2012