Is Time Linear?

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20/02/2010: Hit 2000 Faves. Thanks

Published in the January 2010 issue of the Popular Photography magazine on page 50

Will we ever know for sure?

You can see more of my photos, which i didn't (yet) publish here, on my zenfolio page:

pklinger.zenfolio.com

Technique/Processing

Shot with my Sigma 12-24 @ 24mm. The framing took a few attempts (especially to align the lines of the ceiling with the 12h mark of the clock...

No fancy processing this time, just converted to b&w and a little dodge and burn for more contrast on the clock

Where?

Nearly all my photos are geotagged, so you can see directly on the flickr map where the photo was taken.

This one's been shot in the brand new Guillemins train Station in Liège, Belgium, designed by the famous spanish architect, Santiago Calatrava.

It's still in work though and should be finished by the end of september 2009. Nevertheless, it's already a very impressive structure.

Info

Time is a component of the measuring system used to sequence events, to compare the durations of events and the intervals between them, and to quantify the motions of objects. Time has been a major subject of religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a non-controversial manner applicable to all fields of study has consistently eluded the greatest scholars.

In physics as well as in other sciences, time is considered one of the few fundamental quantities. Time is used to define other quantities – such as velocity – and defining time in terms of such quantities would result in circularity of definition. An operational definition of time, wherein one says that observing a certain number of repetitions of one or another standard cyclical event (such as the passage of a free-swinging pendulum) constitutes one standard unit such as the second, is highly useful in the conduct of both advanced experiments and everyday affairs of life. The operational definition leaves aside the question whether there is something called time, apart from the counting activity just mentioned, that flows and that can be measured. Investigations of a single continuum called spacetime brings the nature of time into association with related questions into the nature of space, questions that have their roots in the works of early students of natural philosophy.

Among prominent philosophers, there are two distinct viewpoints on time. One view is that time is part of the fundamental structure of the universe, a dimension in which events occur in sequence. Time travel, in this view, becomes a possibility as other "times" persist like frames of a film strip, spread out across the time line. Sir Isaac Newton subscribed to this realist view, and hence it is sometimes referred to as Newtonian time. The opposing view is that time does not refer to any kind of "container" that events and objects "move through", nor to any entity that "flows", but that it is instead part of a fundamental intellectual structure (together with space and number) within which humans sequence and compare events. This second view, in the tradition of Gottfried Leibniz and Immanuel Kant, holds that time is neither an event nor a thing, and thus is not itself measurable nor can it be travelled.

Temporal measurement has occupied scientists and technologists, and was a prime motivation in navigation and astronomy. Periodic events and periodic motion have long served as standards for units of time. Examples include the apparent motion of the sun across the sky, the phases of the moon, the swing of a pendulum, and the beat of a heart. Currently, the international unit of time, the second, is defined in terms of radiation emitted by caesium atoms (see below). Time is also of significant social importance, having economic value ("time is money") as well as personal value, due to an awareness of the limited time in each day and in human life spans.

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Thanks for explore #1

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You can license my photos through Getty images

twentyeight, François d'Humières, and 3911 other people added this photo to their favorites.

View 20 more comments

  1. © Juan_de (ON - OFF) 26 months ago | reply

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    Parabéns! Vi esta bela foto em:

    Congratulations! I’ve seen this beautiful photo in:

    greeting phantasy cards

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    Seen in the group"Greeting Phantasy Cards " ( ?² )

  2. Laureos 25 months ago | reply

    Wowww the lines are perflectly placed here!!

  3. Anaïs Pollet 25 months ago | reply

    amazing, great work!

  4. chicopmaia 25 months ago | reply

    Great shot. You are invited to join this group:


    click here to submit

  5. joaniepolonie 23 months ago | reply

    I really love this shot

  6. d35i6n / mark hungsberg 21 months ago | reply

    omg!!! freaking awesome. brilliantly composed and taken.

  7. setasatan 17 months ago | reply

    Brutal las lineas!!!!

  8. Luminary Artist 15 months ago | reply

    Love the lines!

  9. Shahriar Shahidi 14 months ago | reply

    Very well spotted, excellent composition. Feel free to have a look at my images.

  10. davidwhalley 13 months ago | reply

    WOW this is stunning

  11. tim.mcrae 13 months ago | reply

    very very cool

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