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Lloyd's London Architecture

 

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Lloyd's London Architecture

 

One of the most futuristic buildings with the Inside-Out design, Lloyd's of London looks like something out of a Blade Runner movie...The building transforms itself at night when the lights illuminate the striking lifts and staircases...

    

The Lloyd's building (also sometimes known as the Inside-Out Building)[1] is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London, and is located at 1, Lime Street, in the City of London, England.

It was designed by architect Richard Rogers and built between 1978 and 1986. Bovis was the management contractor for the scheme.[2] Like the Pompidou Centre (designed by Renzo Piano and Rogers), the building was innovative in having its services such as staircases, lifts, electrical power conduits and water pipes on the outside, leaving an uncluttered space inside. The twelve glass lifts were the first of their kind in the UK. It is important to note that (like the Pompidou Centre) this building was highly influenced by the work of Archigram in the 1950s and 1960s (see Plug-in City by Archigram for an example).

The building consists of three main towers and three service towers around a central, rectangular space. Its focal point is the large Underwriting Room on the ground floor, which houses the famous Lutine Bell. The Underwriting Room (often simply known as the Room) is overlooked by galleries, forming a 60 metres (197 ft) high atrium lit naturally through a huge barrel-vaulted glass roof. The first four galleries open onto the atrium space, and are connected by escalators through the middle of the structure. The higher floors are glassed-in, and can only be reached via the outside lifts.

 

The Lloyd's building is 88 metres (289 ft) to the roof, with 14 floors.[3] On top of each service core stand the cleaning cranes pushing the height to 95.10 metres (312 ft). Modular in plan, each floor can be altered with the addition or removal of partitions and walls.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd's_building

   

Lloyd's London Architecture

Lloyd's London Architecture

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Taken on February 26, 2012