new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
Photo of Day 4: UNESCO World Heritage Site, Mt Fuji | by Jon Curnow
Back to album

Photo of Day 4: UNESCO World Heritage Site, Mt Fuji

Standing 12,388 ft, Mt Fuji is the highest peak in Japan; a World Heritage Site and, apparently, still classed as an active volcano. It's snow-capped peak has become a symbol of Japan, which I imagine, is something of what makes it attractive to hikers and climbers. According to our tour guide the climbing season starts in July and officially ends in September but he wasn't recommending anybody attempt it after the end of August. Given we were all quite happy in our heated, wifi-enabled coach, I'm not expecting to see any of my fellow tourists climbing next season.

 

We got got as high as 2020m (of the 3776m which make up the aforementioned 12,000 or so ft) before the road was closed due to recent snow falls. Still, the air was crisp, the sun was out and you could see the peak. It's quite an impressive sight, although at the 4th station it's the surrounding peaks you're looking at rather than the one immediately above you.

 

There also seems to be an annual photographic competition which might help explain the abundance of stunning images of the mountain on the internet, as well as the large number of people carrying tripods & camera bags around the tourist locations.

 

My picture may not be up there with the greatest but it's all mine. Taken at the first tour-stop, Lake Kawaguchi-Ko, one of the "five lakes", it was our first proper Mt Fuji sighting. When they said you never forget your first time, perhaps it was views of Mt Fuji they were talking about.

 

Yes, I'm sure that's right.

418 views
0 faves
0 comments
Taken on February 1, 2017