Giant Gulliver from Google Earth, Hunters Hall Park, Craigmillar, Scotland.

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    HOW MANY SCULPTURES CAN YOU SEE USING GOOGLE EARTH?

    Who would have thought, Gulliver, the concrete man from Google Earth! Discovered by Chris Hill. Gulliver is in Craigmillar, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    www.communiversity.org.uk/Gulliver.htm
    www.kewolve.com/Communityarts.htm

    This photo will be part of WORLD COMMUNITY ARTS DAY 17TH FEB 2010
    www.communiversity.org.uk/worldcommunityartsday.htm

    CRAIGMILLAR ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE TRAIL

    15. Gulliver
    Designed 1976 by Jimmy Boyle while in prison.
    Constructed by unemployed adults and youth under a Festival Society’s Job Creation Scheme with voluntary advice from professionals. The 100 ft play structure - the longest concrete sculpture in Europe, now lies neglected and threatened with demolition. To the people of Craigmillar it is an enduring legacy of their journey from “Hard Man” to “Gentle Giant”. The Society’s Comprehensive Plan for Action. The Gentle Giant who Shares and Cares records the journey and gives 400 recommendations for the enhancement of the quality of life in Craigmillar suggested by local people.

    (photo by John Brown)
    www.communiversity.org.uk/Gulliver.htm

    oddobjects, Sandra's Photographs, and 20 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    View 7 more comments

    1. piallos 88 months ago | reply

      Where is it ?

    2. Andrew Niddrie 88 months ago | reply

      piallos, click on map and you will see exactly. Edinburgh Scotland UK.

    3. DecoByDesign 73 months ago | reply

      I had no idea that was there. Thank you for sharing. Guess where I'm going this weekend!

      --
      Seen in Scotland in Words and Pictures (?)

    4. Andrew Niddrie 73 months ago | reply

      sadly it is need of repair and still under threat.

      But if you coming please take a look at map for directions
      www.communiversity.org.uk/arttour.htm
      If you get there then go an look at more hidden gems lurking in Craigmillar's undergrowth. Plenty to see.

      Also have look at
      www.c20society.org.uk/docs/casework/2007_gulliver.html

    5. Abdessamad 56 months ago | reply

      Hi, I'm an admin for a group called Google Maps and Earth, and we'd love to have this added to the group!

      it's beautiful

    6. Heather Milligan 13 56 months ago | reply

      I live just yards from the Gulliver it's so amazing when you go into Google and see just how big it really is. I find it hard to believe that the Gulliver can't be restored.

    7. Andrew Niddrie 56 months ago | reply

      It would not cost a lot to restore Gulliver, but sadly the will is not there from the council. Although they do now recognize its importance. It is truly sad that it will go and very shortsighted. The interest this photo alone proves its. Let alone all the rest.

    8. globalmixx 54 months ago | reply

      google map this

      55.930393,-3.118389

    9. Andrew Niddrie 54 months ago | reply

      that is so cool

    10. Muhammad Ramzan 54 months ago | reply

      Beautiful photo.

    11. smart-coo 49 months ago | reply

      This is such a cool shot, must go out to visit when the sun is shining!

    12. ripple* ~ (((LOVE thy neighbour))) 49 months ago | reply

      Thank you very much Andrew.

      The council should restore this longest concrete sculpture in EUROPE as a tribute to the artist Jimmy Boyle.
      Then and only Art Heritage handed down from generation is still being respected and very much alive, otherwise that the sign, the council concerned is an artless,with the body and soul dispersing (as in the image) !

      I wish to be there and be photographed beside the left ear!

      Greetings rippling from Borneo Island,
      -ripple*

    13. pablo feo 48 months ago | reply

      this too is gulliver in valencia spain. Can you see the lorry down left?

      www.flickr.com/photos/pablofeo/4628873612/

    14. escobarty 42 months ago | reply

      A brief update; October 2010
      The sculpture is on land designated as part of the floodplain restoration project.
      A new mountain bike trail is to be built in the adjacent park. Hopefully if the sculpture is strong enough elements of it will be moved and used in the design of the trail.

    15. Andrew Niddrie 42 months ago | reply

      Yes, we have been fighting this for many years. SAdly we have lost, but it is still a very important Artwork that has travelled the world and influenced many. Putting bits of it in a bike trail really does not do it justice (in my eyes, anyway). THanks for your insight.

    16. Andrew Niddrie 37 months ago | reply

      news.scotsman.com/scotland/Only-one-foot-to-remain.674268...

      Only one foot to remain after Gulliver's travails

      Published Date: 30 March 2011
      By BRIAN FERGUSON
      HE HAS spent the past 35 years slumbering in a field on the south side of Edinburgh.

      The years, the weather and hours of playtime have taken their toll on Gulliver, who is now a shadow of his former self. Most of the sculpture is to be removed

      Gulliver the Gentle Giant was created for Craigmillar by murderer-turned-artist Jimmy Boyle.

      But on April Fool's Day, he will meet his maker when he is forced out to make way for a flood prevention scheme.

      All that can be safely left behind is his left foot - although his entire body is to be preserved in cyberspace under plans to digitally scan the 100ft-long sculpture, which was unveiled by funnyman Billy Connolly in 1976.

      However, local youngsters will be able to seize a souvenir of the crumbling concrete work of art as council chiefs plan to leave the remains behind once it is dismantled with the help of a giant crane this weekend.

      The sculpture, designed by Boyle when he was behind bars in Barlinnie prison in Glasgow, quickly became a favourite play area for children in the 1970s, but it has long since fallen into disrepair. Plans for its removal were announced by the council five years ago to accommodate a new water course that has to be built as part of a flood prevention scheme for the Niddrie Burn.

      The council insists it had no option but to remove Gulliver, but it has earmarked £30,000 for a new piece of public art for the area, which is in the midst of a 15-year, £200 million regeneration programme.

      Laser scanning techniques, which have previously been used to document the likes of Rosslyn Chapel and neolithic sites in Orkney, will be deployed to ensure every inch of the sculpture is properly documented.

      A council spokeswoman said: "The monument is in a very poor state of repair, so it is not possible to relocate it elsewhere, although the contractors will take care to retain whatever elements of the statue they can.

      "Before its removal, a specialist laser survey will be taken of the monument so that future generations from the Craigmillar community and beyond can view it in detail online.

      "The preliminary results of this survey will be available for members of the public to look at on a planned open day on Saturday, 16 April, where they will also be offered tours of recent archaeological discoveries made on the site, including the remains of an 18th-century icehouse belonging to Niddrie Marischal House."

      John Lawson, the council's archaeologist, said: "Using laser technology to record a piece of public artwork is not something archaeologists get to do every day, but in this case we felt it was important for the local community to undertake this extra step before the statue is dismantled. "We're pleased that the community will be able to enjoy the Gulliver monument even after these essential works have been carried out."

    17. Islawoman 3 months ago | reply

      Only just seen the photo, I imagine he has gone now, but the idea of a large sculpture being seen from google earth has given me ideas for making something for the 8th World Community Arts day. cheers

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