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The Dresden Frauenkirche,  like the phoenix, has risen renewed from its ashes. | by peggyhr
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The Dresden Frauenkirche, like the phoenix, has risen renewed from its ashes.

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In 1990, as a graduate student (German Literature) on a visit to Dresden, I remember looking at the pile of rubble that had once been Die Frauenkirche. At that time, I could hardly have imagined that 20 years later I would be able not only to stand in awe of this magnificent church but also to enter it and enjoy a marvellous concert!!

  

The Dresden Frauenkirche (German: Dresdner Frauenkirche, literally Church of Our Lady) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, Germany.

 

Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the firebombing of Dresden during World War II. It has been reconstructed as a landmark symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004, its interior in 2005 and, after 13 years of rebuilding, the church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. [...].

 

On 13 February 1945, Anglo-American allied forces began the bombing of Dresden. The church withstood two days and nights of the attacks and the eight interior sandstone pillars supporting the large dome held up long enough for the evacuation of 300 people who had sought shelter in the church crypt, before succumbing to the heat generated by some 650,000 incendiary bombs that were dropped on the city. The temperature surrounding and inside the church eventually reached 1,000 degrees Celsius.[1] The dome finally collapsed at 10 a.m. on 15 February. The pillars glowed bright red and exploded; the outer walls shattered and nearly 6,000 tons of stone plunged to earth, penetrating the massive floor as it fell.

 

The altar, a relief depiction of Jesus’ agony in the Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives by Johann Christian Feige, was only partially damaged during the bombing raid and fire that destroyed the church. The altar and the structure behind it, the chancel, were among the remnants left standing. [...].

 

The building vanished from Dresden's skyline, and the blackened stones would lie in wait in a pile in the center of the city for the next 45 years as Communist rule enveloped what was now East Germany. Shortly after the end of World War II, residents of Dresden had already begun salvaging unique stone fragments from the Church of Our Lady and numbering them for future use in reconstruction. Popular sentiment discouraged the authorities from clearing the ruins away to make a car park. In 1966, the remnants were officially declared a "memorial against war", and state-controlled commemorations were held there on the anniversaries of the destruction of Dresden.

 

In 1982, the ruins began to be the site of a peace movement combined with peaceful protests against the East German regime. [...] By 1989, the number of protesters in Dresden, Leipzig and other parts of East Germany had increased to tens of thousands, and the wall dividing East and West Germany toppled. This opened the way to the reunification of Germany.

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dresden_Frauenkirche

 

Enjoy your new week and thanks for visiting.

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Taken on August 15, 2010