Oscar Wilde #3 - Looking at the stars

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A note for visitors coming via Chris Zeigler's grumpy comments in

The 9 Most Baffling Monuments to Great People.

 

I'm unsure why Londoners - or anyone else - would find Oscar "baffling".

After all, sculptor Maggi Hambling gives us a few small clues. Like the quotation from one of his plays - in very large letters. Plus his name and dates.

 

To be fair to Chris, he seems to taken a few moments to sit on the sculpture/bench for a chat with Oscar. Only to be scared in case: "that thing would begin with it beckoning our souls down into whatever pit of hell it slithered up from ..."

 

So I guess Chris must have visited on a really bad day. When we stroll across Trafalgar Square and past St Martin's Church to pay our respects, Oscar always seems smiling and relaxed — especially for someone who's been dead over a century. And though Maggi Hambling's metal tendrils suggest some worm activity, and his hair is slightly dishevelled, will Chris Zeigler look any better in the next century?

 

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Photo 23 March 2008. Londoners seem to have taken to Maggi Hambling's sculpture which wittily commemorates Oscar Wilde.

 

The quotation is from Wilde's play Lady Windermere’s Fan :

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars”.

 

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§ Oscar Wilde #3 Italian translation from Google.

§ Download the English version of Lady Windermere's Fan from Project Gutenberg Website.

§ Another sculpture by Maggi Hambling - Scallop - provoked controversy in Aldeburgh on the Suffolk coast. That sculpture honours the composer Benjamin Britten. (1) (2) .

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