new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
Ulegal Perambulations and Hume's Broom. Ulex europaeus, Golden Broom, Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK | by Rana Pipiens
Back to photostream

Ulegal Perambulations and Hume's Broom. Ulex europaeus, Golden Broom, Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

The afternoon was quickly darkening and rain was in the air as I walked up the hill from Old Calton Cemetery - where David Hume's mausoleum is - in Edinburgh. My perambulation was on the Hume Walk, and the only light spots were the occasional flashes of brightness from little, sharply spiked clumps of Ulex europaeus, Golden Gorse, a close relative of Broom.

The great Scottish philosopher David Hume (1711-1776) had signed a petition to make Calton Hill a public park for recreational use, one of the first such in Britain. In 1775 the path on which I was walking had opened. The stands of Broom, Cytisus scoparius, reminded me of the logical problem of 'identity', often called the 'paradox' of Hume's Broom. In short: is the broom which a sweeper has been using for thirty years the same broom even if its twigs and handle have been replaced many times? What number of its parts has to have been exchanged for it no longer to be the same broom? Whatever the case, our Cytisus was a favorite plant of which to make brooms.

It was the Ulex, however, which held my fascination. But my photos were too grainy - too dark - to post.

Yesterday, though was a very bright, blue-skied day. We took another perambulation, this time around Arthur's Seat to Duddingston to have a pint in the Sheep Heid Inn with my godson, coincidentally named Arthur like the King of Edinburgh's Head.

The sun was right, the light was good, the company was patient. I got this pretty Ulex to pose in a small lull of the wind, sharp spikes and buds and all.

4,539 views
22 faves
97 comments
Taken on February 10, 2011