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Melton. Lavenders and rosemary in the garden of part of Eynesbury homestead. These bay window wings were added in 1885 to the original 1872 homestead of William Staughton. | by denisbin
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Melton. Lavenders and rosemary in the garden of part of Eynesbury homestead. These bay window wings were added in 1885 to the original 1872 homestead of William Staughton.

Eynesbury Homestead.

Simon Staughton arrived in the Port Phillip district of NSW in 1841. He took up pastoral lands west of Melbourne covering over 100,000 acres which he named Exford. His Exford homestead was built in 1845. After Victoria became a separate colony from NSW in 1851 some of the big estate was resumed for closer settlement. Over 30,000 acres was taken for the town of Melton and surrounding lands in 1852. When Simon Staughton died in 1863 his four sons inherited over 70,000 acres and the land which was divided between them thus creating the properties of Exford, Eynesbury, Nerowie and Staughton Vale. Only Eynesbury had no homestead on it so in 1872 William Staughton had a grand basalt bluestone mansion erected on his 20,000 acre property. In addition to the house extensive servants’ quarters, stables, store rooms and stables were built in the similar architectural style. In 1947 this huge estate was purchased by Charlie and Antony Baillieu who continued to run it as a sheep station. The magnificent homestead is now used as a gold club rooms, restaurant and weddings venue. Around 15 buildings on the estate are heritage listed including the homestead, the staff quarters (1880), the stables ( 1880), the meat house, smoke room and water tank 1870, the bluestone cottage ( 1880) and the dairy (1890). The central part of the expansive homestead from 1872 is two storey with a windows walk on the roof. The single storey side pavilion wings with bay windows extensions were added in 1885. The front garden is also enclosed within a basalt bluestone garden wall and the outbuildings formed a quadrangle behind the main house. Beyond the garden wall is an artificial lake. The Staughton brothers were one of the largest freehold landowners in Victoria and so Eynesbury is especially significant for its size, consistency and grandeur.

 

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Taken on April 22, 2017