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Hermosa Water Tank | by Thad Roan - Bridgepix
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Hermosa Water Tank

Historic wooden Water Tank at Hermosa, Colorado, 11 miles north of Durango.

 

Milepost 462.5: The old wooden water tank in Hermosa, one of only two remaining on the Durango-Silverton line, has been structurally stabilized but is not operational at this time. Water is currently pumped out of a converted tank car when it is needed. The Denver & Rio Grande built this wooden water tank at Hermosa so engine crews could fill their tenders one last time before embarking up the long hill toward Silverton. (Source - America's Railroad - The Official Guidebook by Robert T. Royem)

 

The Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad (D&SNG) is a narrow gauge heritage railroad in the U.S. State of Colorado that operates over the 45 miles (72 km) of 36-inch (914 mm) track between Durango in La Plata County and Silverton in San Juan County. The railway is a federally designated National Historic Landmark and is also designated by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark.

 

The trackage was originally built between 1881 and 1882, by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, in order to carry silver and gold ore mined in the San Juan Mountains. The line was an extension of the D&RG narrow gauge from Antonito, Colorado to Durango. The Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad operates the line from Antonito to Chama, New Mexico. The line from Chama to Durango has been abandoned and removed. The line from Durango to Silverton, however, has run continuously since 1881, although it is now a tourist and heritage line hauling passengers, and is one of the few places in the United States which has seen continuous use of steam locomotives. In March 1981, the Denver & Rio Grande Western sold the line and the D&SNG was formed.

 

Some of the rolling stock dates back to the 1880s. The trains run from Durango to the Cascade Wye in the winter months and run from Durango to Silverton during the summer months. (Wikipedia)

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Taken on September 28, 2009