The Windmill and the New Chambers, Palace Sanssousi, Potsdam, Germany

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    Sanssouci is the name of the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles. While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, it too is notable for the numerous temples and follies in the park. The palace was designed by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff between 1745 and 1747 to fulfill King Frederick's need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court. The palace's name emphasises this; it is a French phrase (sans souci), which translates as "without concerns", meaning "without worries" or "carefree", symbolising that the palace was a place for relaxation rather than a seat of power. The palace is little more than a large single-storey villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. The influence of King Frederick's personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace was so great that its style is characterised as 'Frederician Rococo', and his feelings for the palace were so strong that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him". Because of a disagreement about the site of the palace in the park, Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect, finished the project.

    During the 19th century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the grounds and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918.

    After World War II, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. It was fully maintained with due respect to its historical importance, and was open to the public. Following German reunification in 1990, the final wish of Frederick came to pass: his body was finally returned to his beloved palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO; in 1995, the Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanssouci

    Frederician Rococo is a form of rococo, which developed in Prussia during the reign of Frederick the Great and combined influences from both France and the Netherlands. Its most famous adherent was the architect Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff. Furthermore, the painter Antoine Pesne and even King Frederick himself influenced Knobelsdorff's designs. Famous buildings in the Frederican style include Sans Souci Palace, the Potsdam City Palace, and parts of Charlottenburg Palace.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederician_Rococo

    The building, which stands to the west of Sanssouci Palace, serves as a complement to the Picture Gallery, which lies to the east. Both buildings flank the summer palace. The chambers replaced an orangery, which had been built at that site in 1745 on plans by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff and held the terraces' potted plants during the winter months. Ramps, on which the tubs were taken in and out, serve as reminders of the building's original use. Master builder Georg Christian Unger was commissioned to turn the orangery building into a guesthouse. The building's basic elements were left alone, as were its size and floor-to-ceiling french doors. The most obvious change was the addition of a cupola on the middle section. The similarities between the architecture of the New Chambers and that of the Picture Gallery are such that the both buildings can be mistaken for the other.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_Chambers_at_Sanssouci

    There has been a windmill very near to Sanssouci Palace since 1738. From 1787-91, Frederick William II had the old, adjustable windmill replaced by a larger windmill based on a Dutch model that included a stone foundation and a gallery.

    www.spsg.de/index_158_en.html

    Lo.egypt, famkefonz, kata_batic, and 63 other people added this photo to their favorites.

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    1. Vinay Lohar Portraiture 27 months ago | reply

      This photo really sparkles! Great shot!

    2. leuntje 27 months ago | reply

      Oh...Potsdam ! Daar ben ik in een ver verleden ook eens geweest..
      Mooie opname, Ferry ! Fraai geframed door de takken !

    3. Zita Kamugira 27 months ago | reply


      I saw this in the 25+ Faves group and Faved it.

    4. msonflk(off) 27 months ago | reply

      nice historical place...well captured.

    5. Estevam Cesar_Very busy_Return after April 21 27 months ago | reply

      Excellent angle of the palace, colors and the windmill in the background!

    6. These * Are * My * Photons 27 months ago | reply

      Wow your work is very interesting! The image is a great compote of structures, framed by foliage, the written accompaniments to your images always educate, fantastic stuff :)

    7. Kostas Petropoulos Photography 27 months ago | reply

      You Are Invited To Add Your Photo to

      Eyes On The World

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    8. Liêm Phó Nhòm 27 months ago | reply

      A wonderful capture of the architectural details.

    9. RiekePhotography 27 months ago | reply

      I've been there a few times. Nice capture!

    10. elmofoto 27 months ago | reply

      The way the vegetation frames the building works so well!

    11. Bhaskar Dutta 27 months ago | reply

      A very nice viewpoint!

    12. Lyutik966 27 months ago | reply

      very beautiful building! wonderful architectural details! great composition and photo!

    13. Maria_Globetrotter 26 months ago | reply

      Love this view of the palace! I may have been there when I was 17... ;-) Don't really remember...

    14. Rosa Dik 009 -- On & Off 26 months ago | reply

      Excellent work, superb frame !!!

    15. All the tired horses 26 months ago | reply

      Excellent picture, taken from the perfect spot!

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