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Kolel Kaunas Consolidated with Kolel House of Israel | by Center for Jewish History, NYC
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Kolel Kaunas Consolidated with Kolel House of Israel

Kolel Kaunas (Kovno) consolidated with Kolel House of Israel. Talmudical Academy Kolel of Kaunas and Kolel Beis Israel Kaunes, Lithuania. Kaunas, Lithuania

 

 

Library of the Kovno Kollel

 

 

In 1877, Rabbi Yisroel ben Ze’ev Wolf Lipkin – also known as Yisroel Salanter – founded a Kolel (a yeshiva for young, but married, men) in the city of Kaunes (Kovno), Lithuania. The purpose of this Kolel was to teach aspiring scholars the ways of the Musar movement (of which Lipkin was the founder), a non-Hasidic Orthodox movement that sought to emphasize ethical conduct and spiritual devotion. Over the course of several decades the Kovno Kollel grew in size as well as reputation and came to be closely associated with the Musar movement – all of which was possible in a city with as vibrant a Jewish community as that which was found in Kovno before the Second World War. When the Nazis invaded and occupied Kovno the Kolel suffered the same tragic fate as most of the city’s Jewish residents.

 

 

This book stamp is from a book looted by the Nazis and sorted by Colonel Seymour Pomrenze, one of “the Monuments Men,” at the Offenbach Archival Depot.

 

 

There are two scrapbooks of archival markings from the books sorted at the Offenbach Depot in the Seymour Pomrenze Collection held by the American Jewish Historical Society (Call number P-933) There is a finding aid for the collection here The digitized scrapbooks are available here and here.

 

 

For more information on this project check the Center’s blog: 16thstreet.tumblr.com/tagged/Offenbach-Depot

 

 

Dr. Mitch Fraas, Acting Director of the Digital Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Special Collections Center is working on a similar project for the German book stamps based on NARA microfilm of the volumes the American Jewish Historical Society currently holds. See viewshare.org/views/mfraas/offenbach-bookplates/

 

 

The Center for Jewish History would like to acknowledge the following: The American Jewish Historical Society, who graciously allowed the use of their archival materials and digital content; Mitch Fraas, Acting Director of the Digital Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Special Collections Center, for his data and technical assistance in this project; David Rosenberg, Senior Manager for Communications, and Melanie Meyers, Senior Reference Services Librarian for Special Collections, for managing and creating the digital map; as well as Reference Services Librarian Zachary Loeb and Reference Services Assistant Ilya Slavutskiy for their work on translating and mapping.

 

 

For copyright information, click here

 

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Uploaded on May 14, 2015