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Clare St Barnabas Anglican church | by aquilareen
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Clare St Barnabas Anglican church

Hope. Window in memory of John & Isabella Matilda Hope.

 

“At St. Barnabas's Church yesterday morning two stained glass windows were unveiled. . . The windows, which represent Hope and Faith, are the gift of Mrs. J. Christison, one in memory of her father and mother, and the other of her husband.” [Observer 28 Mar 1914]

 

“HOPE.—On the 20th June, [died] at the York Hotel, Adelaide, John Hope, Esq., of Wolta Wolta, Clare, deeply regretted.” [Advertiser 23 Jun 1880]

 

“HOPE.—On the 9th December, [died] at Maretimo, Glenelg, Isabella Matilda, widow of the late John Hope, of Clare.” [Advertiser 11 Dec 1899]

 

Church foundation stone 1850 by Mrs E B Gleeson, opened 1851, consecrated Feb 1864, chancel & vestry (architect R R Page) 1875. Schoolroom opened 24 Sep 1886, enlarged 1919. First services in courthouse.

 

“Clare has an Episcopal Church, the one we mentioned as on the hill, near the entrance of the village from the Burra, in course of erection; the design is Gothic, and the edifice will perhaps contain 200 persons; but it is not far advanced, and there seemed a want of funds, or energy, or something to complete it.” [Register 15 Jul 1851]

 

“Bishop Short speaks thus of the Clare Church, in 1857 — ‘The Church at Clare; desolate enough, even the gables falling out. Forty-five in all at church, including the Bungaree party. After service, baptized a child and spoke to the churchwardens about saving the building by tierods and fencing the churchyard.’" [Observer 25 Aug 1928]

 

“St. Barnabas's, after having for several years remained in an unfinished and dilapidated state, has recently undergone considerable repairs and improvements. The whole of the western end of the church has been rebuilt, and likewise a portion of the eastern. The porch has been removed from the north side to the west end and enlarged. The edifice has been reroofed with metal floored, ceiled, and plastered.” [Register 21 Mar 1864]

 

“enlarging the building by throwing down a portion of the eastern wall, and building thereto a chancel, with vestry adjoining. . . the neat and substantial appearance of the new portion of the structure, the walls being strongly built, and the corners faced with quoins of beautiful white freestone. The end window, which has three lights, is very handsome, and contains a good deal of dressed work. . . Separating the chancel from the body of the church is a handsome arch of elegant proportions.” [Northern Argus 1 Jun 1875]

 

“Rev. S J Bloyd succeeded Mr. Radcliff. During his incumbency [1919] a cross was placed on the porch gable in memory of Sarah Ann Lee, a communicant and constant attendant of the church for over 40 years. It was given by her children.” [Chronicle 13 Jun 1929]

 

“Schoolroom . . . We might mention that an edifice of this description has been a long felt want, and an idea was mooted some time ago to build a church, and convert the present structure into a schoolroom. Plans and specifications were drawn up and tenders invited and sent in, but it was found that the building would be too expensive, and as the Committee did not deem it prudent to involve the congregation in debt the project was abandoned. The pastor, however, nothing daunted consulted Mr. G. E. Farrar, who submitted plans and specifications.” [Northern Argus 28 Sep 1886]

 

“It is not often that two Churches in one parish celebrate their centenaries but such is the case this year with St. Barnabas' Clare, and St. Mark's Penwortham, both of whom were opened for service 1851. When the Rev. J. C. Bagshawe took charge of the parish 1849, there were no church buildings and no parsonage. . . Church services were held at Clare in the Courthouse (afterwards the Casualty Hospital). . . Mr. Bagshawe designed both Churches. . . The Clare Church bell also keeps its centenary, as in 1852 John Bristow Hughes, of Bundaleer, gave it as a thankoffering for the birth of his eldest daughter, Maria.” [Northern Argus 25 Jul 1951]

 

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Taken on September 18, 2016