Ancient Guide

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    coated with lichen in dense sea fog atop a coastal hill. Made of Precambrian rocks from the Canadian Shield. From its perch in the peneplained tundra, it may have been overlooking Hudson Bay when European whalers first chanced by.
    Best viewed large.

    More inuksuit? please see my "Heart of the Arctic" gallery.
    www.flickr.com/photos/31856336@N03/galleries/721576236287...

    Notice the complete absence of trees? Ground that remains frozen all year round is called tundra. The cause is permafrost, which is the "mark of the white dragon" left behind by continental glaciation, now retreated to the nether regions of High Arctic Canada. The treeline is 200 km south while the polar ice caps are another 1000 km north. 20% of the northern hemisphere falls within the realm of permafrost. When you are standing upon continental or alpine tundra, you are standing -in- the Ice Age.
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    carl lexicon, Lakerdog, and 16 other people added this photo to their favorites.

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    1. subarcticmike 57 months ago | reply

      Thx zxgirl. It is in a very windy spot with many a storm and long blustery winters. It's covered by lichen, so we are looking at a survivor.

    2. Gavatron 57 months ago | reply

      So cool. I'm so tired of seeing Euro-Inukshuks put up on the side of road in cottage country here in Ontario—these are powerful symbols and I'm somewhat disappointed that they're being co-opted by people who have no idea of their cultural and historical significance. They're becoming like dreamcatchers. (end rant)

      --
      Seen on your photo stream. (?)

    3. zxgirl 57 months ago | reply

      That's amazing and wonderful. How big?

    4. Kaatjes Plaatjes 57 months ago | reply

      Hey Mike,

      Its beautifull!

      Greets,
      Erica

    5. dhelling01 57 months ago | reply

      Very nice. Thanks for posting this.

    6. carl lexicon 57 months ago | reply

      A timeless structure...really striking.

    7. subarcticmike 57 months ago | reply

      Thx to all for stopping by North of 60.
      gavatron: pls peruse me' Favs for more pix of the real thing.
      zxgirl: about the height of a person
      carl & lakerdog: appreciate the Fav's

    8. zxgirl 57 months ago | reply

      Oh WOW! Hard to tell scale in this shot. That's fantastic.

    9. Ballygrant Boy 57 months ago | reply

      Excellent presentation! The foggy background really gives you a sight of the Inukshuk at work. Well done!

    10. GEO M I 57 months ago | reply

      It's the Sorcerors' hat from Hogwarts! Yay! You have been taking pictures with one of your new cameras! Very nice!

    11. barb.schultheis 57 months ago | reply

      Great shot! I like the lighting--it adds to the mystery

    12. wanderflechten 57 months ago | reply

      beyond beautiful

      pathos

      (lichenometry could be used to determine a minimum age)

    13. subarcticmike 57 months ago | reply

      Thanks to all for your encouragement..

      'Matna' wanderflechten for the fav.
      Could you provide a good reference for lichenometry?

    14. wanderflechten 57 months ago | reply

      Actually I don't know much about lichenometry. There was a manual published 20 or 30 years ago. Some links:
      rdgs.dk/djg/pdfs/108/1/10.pdf
      hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/4/3/307 www.geo.arizona.edu/palynology/geos462/13lichenometry.html
      www.blackwellpublishing.com:443/Microbiology/pdfs/lichens...
      gsa.confex.com/gsa/2008NE/finalprogram/abstract_135282.htm

      I find it amazing how slow some lichens grow, and how old some of them must be. Looking at a curve (I assume its a Rhizocarpon) from Baffin Island (on the 3rd link above), in the linear region the lichen diameter increases about 3 mm / 100 years.

      One of my favorite books on lichens is "Lichens of Antarctica and South Georgia" by Ovstedal and Smith, 2001. They mention that "... lichens have, in fact, been found on the most southerly nunataks..." on the continent (86 degrees, 29 minutes south, 1580 m). Also that "... some continental Antarctic lichens have been shown to continue photosynthysis in situ to minus 17 degrees C". (Lichens have also survived exposure to vacuum and radiation of space for 14 days on an ESA mission.)

      sorry if I got carried away

    15. Kevin Hildahl 56 months ago | reply

      The lichen adds all the scale it needs - nice one Mike

    16. subarcticmike 54 months ago | reply

      mom sues view
      Welcome back and thank you for all your Fav's!

    17. Gatis.P 51 months ago | reply

      This photo has been included in website Wondermondo - an armchair guide to world attractions, description of the most outstanding places in Canada. Many thanks for this beautiful picture!
      info@wondermondo.com

    18. Walt K 23 months ago | reply

      Very interesting as I am finding this entire set of yours -- thanks for sharing!

    19. subarcticmike 23 months ago | reply

      Welcome back Walt K so I can thank you too.
      I enjoy riding along with your worldwide travels.
      A number of your 'earthy' views are in my galleries and favs.

    20. Tim Lawnicki 5 weeks ago | reply

      Pretty humbling to see this survivor from deep time. Thanks for a thought-provoking shot and analysis, Mike.

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