I LOVE BILL................

We need to add an amendment that would forbid any of our rights to be cancelled, nullified, ammended, removed or restricted by any treaty with other nations or organizations of nations. We need to do this asap.....

 

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  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    We need to add an amendment that would forbid any of our rights to be cancelled, nullified, ammended, removed or restricted by any treaty with other nations or organizations of nations. We need to do this asap.....
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    In the United States, the Bill of Rights is the name by which the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution are known.[1] They were introduced by James Madison to the First United States Congress in 1789 as a series of articles, and came into effect on December 15, 1791, when they had been ratified by three-fourths of the States. Thomas Jefferson was the main proponent of the Bill of Rights.[2]

    The Bill of Rights prohibits Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise therof, forbids infringement of "...the right of the people to keep and bear Arms...", and prohibits the federal government from depriving any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law. In federal criminal cases, it requires indictment by grand jury for any capital or "infamous crime", guarantees a speedy public trial with an impartial jury composed of members of the state or judicial district in which the crime occurred, and prohibits double jeopardy. In addition, the Bill of Rights states that "the enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people,"[3] and reserves all powers not granted to the federal government to the citizenry or States. Most of these restrictions were later applied to the states by a series of decisions applying the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, which was ratified in 1868, after the American Civil War.

    Madison proposed the Bill of Rights while ideological conflict between Federalists and anti-Federalists, dating from the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, threatened the overall ratification of the new national Constitution. It largely responded to the Constitution's influential opponents, including prominent Founding Fathers, who argued that the Constitution should not be ratified because it failed to protect the basic principles of human liberty. The Bill was influenced by George Mason's 1776 Virginia Declaration of Rights, the 1689 English Bill of Rights, works of the Age of Enlightenment pertaining to natural rights, and earlier English political documents such as Magna Carta (1215).

    Two additional articles were proposed to the States; only the final ten articles were ratified quickly and correspond to the First through Tenth Amendments to the Constitution. The first Article, dealing with the number and apportionment of U.S. Representatives, never became part of the Constitution. The second Article, limiting the ability of Congress to increase the salaries of its members, was ratified two centuries later as the 27th Amendment. Though they are incorporated into the document known as the "Bill of Rights", neither article establishes a right as that term is used today. For that reason, and also because the term had been applied to the first ten amendments long before the 27th Amendment was ratified, the term "Bill of Rights" in modern U.S. usage means only the ten amendments ratified in 1791.

    The Bill of Rights plays a central role in American law and government, and remains a fundamental symbol of the freedoms and culture of the nation. One of the original fourteen copies of the Bill of Rights is on public display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    "BE WARY OF ANY AND/ OR ALL TREATIES SIGNED BETWEEN US. AND UNITED NATIONS OR ANY OTHER ORGANIZATION. OUR BILL OF RIGHTS MUST NEVER BE AMENDED FOR THE BENEFIT OF ANY UNITED NATIONS TREATIES OR SCHEMES.......R.L. HUFFSTUTTER
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    Anyone who believes the u.N .Should have priority over u.S. Policies is ready for the new world order. The first order is: Get the hell out this country!
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    ESSAY ON GUN RIGHTS, THE UNITED NATIONS AND FOREIGN TROOPS IN OUR NATION BY R.L. HUFFSTUTTER...

    WILL AMERICA EVER SEE FOREIGN PEACEKEEPERS IN OUR CITIES? WILL FOREIGN OR UN TROOPS EVER BE CONSCRIPTED BY WORLD ORGANIZATIONS TO COLLECT OUR GUNS AND KEEP THEM FOR US? (OF COURSE, RECEIPTS WOULD BE ISSUED). DO YOU RECALL WHEN OUR GOVERNMENT WERE PLANNING ON HIRING THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT TO OPERATE AND MAINTAIN OUR PORT CITIES? IT DID NOT HAPPEN BECAUSE THE PEOPLE...WE DOTH PROTEST...

    MOST PEOPLE WILL LAUGH, BUT THEY HAVE NOT READ ALL OF THE INFORMATION PENDING ABOUT GUN CONTROL TREATIES IN THE US IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE UNITED NATIONS. DO NOT BE SURPRISED WHEN YOU LEAST EXPECT IT TO HAPPEN. THERE ARE SEVERAL REASON WHY THE U.S. GOVERNMENT MIGHT IMPORT A LEAGUE OF FOREIGN PEACEKEEPERS TO CONTROL DISSENTION IN THE USA. ONE MAIN REASON IS SIMPLY THAT OUR OWN TROOPS WOULD BE HESITANT TO GO DOOR TO DOOR COLLECTING OUR FIREARMS, THUS A FEW MILLION FOREIGN TROOPS DRESSED UP IN NINJA GEAR MIGHT SCARE THE HELL OUT OF THE GENERAL POPULACE AND CONVINCE THEM IN SHORT ORDER TO TURN OVER THEIR WEAPONS. OF COURSE, THEY WOULD GIVE YOU A RECEIPT. THUS, BE WARY OF FOREIGN TREATIES.

    BEWARE OF ALL THE TREATIES THAT ARE BEING CONSIDERED IN CONGRESS THAT FOCUS ON FIREARMS AND OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER NATIONS.

    f you are a believer in our full Constitutional rights, like I am, you will surely believe the second amendment (Bill of Rights) permits most citizens of the United States to own, keep and bear firearms; you believe we are entitled to possess firearms for the protection of our lives, the lives of our family and for the protection of our life, liberty, possessions and additionally, our pursuit of happiness which I interrpet as our democracy. You and I know that there are many citizens and government officials that would like nothing more than a mass collection of our weapons.

    Well, don't look for this to happen anytime soon, not in our lifetimes, for certain. Most of my generation would fight to keep our weapons. So, this is why I am forewarning all who believe in the Second Amendment to be vigilant and aware of all of the treaties our Congress is considering that involves firearms, especially those that deal with the United Nations. Although our Constitution cannot be rewritten to remove these rights (at least not in our lifetimes), there are treaties being considered with the United Nations at this very minute that would greatly change our gun policies, policies that would not make one smile.

    Please keep abreast of these bills that are pending in Congress and bills that would make us a signer of such treaties. Please research these proceedings and post them on your website and in yourgalleries and photostreams. Let us prohibit those who would try to enter the back door of our homes and steal our guns through tricky and deceiving legislation.
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    President Obama has pointed out that the Constitution is basically a document that is about "what the government doesn't do or cannot do for you or to you."

    In the same speech, he mentions that the Constitution is "...not a document that outlines what the Government can do for you or to you." The above is to paraphrase what President Obama said; I am looking for his exact words on the subject. Since hearing him describe the Constitution in those terms, I have been searching my mind for his reasons for mentioning the subject. It is, for certain, one interesting subject and one that all Americans might want to ponder.

    While the President is enjoying a well-deserved vacation at Martha's Vineyard, I am going to visit a few vineyards wherever I might happen to be at any given moment.

    There are many vineyards in California and a good number in Missouri. The wine from either of the states can be sweet or bitter depending upon one's preferences. I have a small book, an old Penguin book I purchased many years ago, that includes the Constitution and thousands of footnotes in reference to the many folks who have had different views that had to be settled, once and for all.

    Well, some haven't really been settled "once and for all." That's the scarry aspect to Constitutional law. Mr. Obama, if I remember correctly, was a student in Constitutional Law, thus I feel confident he knows much more about the law that governs this great nation than I have learned. However, one great fact about the Constitution is that it's basically a simple and easy-to-read document. It is the kind of document, in my opinion, that is strikingly straightforward without room for imagination to fill the spaces between the lines.

    That is the great feature about the Constitution that has made these United States the greatest Democracy on earth, a fact I know President Obama realizes. That he has taken the Presidential oath to preserve this document and protect it, and the people, from all enemies, foreign and domestic, gives me assurance that he will make the right decisions. In this respect, the Constitution is a very basic document; it leaves no room for doubt about who is for us and who is against us.

    Having visited vineyards at various times during my lifetime, I know that there are places where one can reflect and rest in the shade, little areas where one might want to simply take time out, not for wine, but for some serious consideration about what our nation is going to be in ten years, in twenty years, or one-hundred years from now. If I had my life to repeat, I might have selected Constitutional Law as my academic specialty.

    Until recently, I had never considered how interesting the Consitution can be when one begins an attempt to try to understand it more clearly. In this respect, President Obama has added new inspiration for millions of Americans of all ages to be more aware of our Constitution.

    And for our youth who have yet to make their decision about their future, one can fairly assume that many new students will be enrolling in Constitutional Law courses
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    I have one thing to say about the first and second amendment. Neither of the two will be cancelled. No way. Both are written in stone and sealed in the blood of our military. If there is no bill of rights with the first two amendements, there will be no america. Real simple, real easy. America with either of these two rights denied will not be america.
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    CONVERSATION ABOUT TAXES, NEWSPAPERS AND WHISKY

    Recently, while taking time out at the Ale House, I overheard some conversation about the plight of the nation's newspapers. There was a consensus that more major newspapers are going to go bankrupt. I listened carefully as the discussion divided into those who felt that the newspapers should go bankrupt if their sales were not paying their bills.

    The opposing group felt differently. Several from both sides of the discussion sat their tankards of ale down with a noise that was most surely meant to dispense their displeasure with their opposition. The noise was cantankerous and rude, nevertheless, I continued monitoring the conversation.

    "I believe that there should be some type of government help for the ailing journals," stated one gentleman as he examined his fingernails as though performing some type of Onamismic celebration. Another gentlemen fiddled with his garter as the conversation continued.

    As the hour neared the midnight, I felt obliged to make my presence known. Trying to enter the conversation was like trying to enter the face of a granite mountain. There was a barrier between us that I could only sense would keep them from hearing what I had to say.

    Thus, content to simply be the silent observer, their conversations became more and more intense. When I heard one tall gentleman stand and say something about free enterprise and mention that his whisky business was sometimes better in one year than it was in another year. Somebody responded about getting the government to place a whisky tax on his still. Another gentleman scoffed and made a loud statement about taxation. I so wanted to interrupt their conversation to tell them important information, but again, my presence was never recognized.

    Alas, as the group began to call their conversation to a close, I watched them remolding the felt edges of their tri-cornered hats and shaking hands. "We will talk about this in Philadelphia soon," one gentleman stated, adding that "free enterprise was the key to a nation's success."
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    what is it with the ACLU wanting to remove the cross from a war memorial? Are we going to let these P.O.S. run our government or are we going to let the Constitution set the law?
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    Has there been a decision on the cross removal issue?
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 6y

    IF HEALTHCARE WITH A PUBLIC OPTION PASSES...............

    It will become one of the most discriminating pieces of legislation ever penned since 1865. If American citizens and residents are going to be forced to pay into such a plan, it must be for all, and this includes all government employees including the President, the Congress and the Supreme Court. We shall all heal or suffer equally. This is an original quote, it's mine.

    There should be no rationing or discrimination by age, race, immigration or citizenship status. That is to say, simply, there will be no favoritism in the despensing of medical care and treatment. This means that there will be no lists of who will get the transplant or the heart depending on needs by age, race, creed or political party. All Americans will be given a number that will not list their personal data. Healthcare will then be given by the draw, or a lottery to prevent special interests.

    FOR THOSE WHO STILL HAVE MONEY AND WANT TO SEEK PRIVATE CARE, perhaps they will have the choice to purchase such care from American PHYSICIANS IF THEY ARE STILL PERMITTED TO PRACTICE PRIVATELY. IF NOT, THEN THE ILL WITH MONEY CAN FLY TO A NATION WHERE HEALTHCARE OF THE KIND GIVEN BY TOP MEDICAL FACILITIES IS AVAILABLE.

    THIS IS HOW THE HEALTHCARE WITH THE PUBLIC OPTION SHOULD WORK. Yes, that means that those with the cash will still have the option of going to the head of the line if they find a line that takes cash. Will private healthcare be outlawed in the U.S.? Has anyone considered this? And how will this affect our military and those who receive care at the Veterans Administration Medical Care facilities? One can readily see the type of confusion and conflict such a program will create.

    To solve these problems, HARRY AND NANCY GO BEHIND CLOSED DOORS to write, rewrite and erase. How does this make you feel? Do you feel like it is about time to opt out of such a program?
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 5y

    One thing every american man and woman who believes in a free society must remember is this simple statement:

    We the american citizens make the rules--the politicians are hired to enforce them. When this changes, it is time to impeach the politicians who will not follow our orders............
  • David Foster 5y

    Fantastic photo and we love to have it and any other photo that fits the scope of our group in: U.S. Politics and the World; Political Debate & Discussion Blog www.flickr.com/groups/worldpolitics/

    Thanks

    David
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 5y

    We-the-people november-liberation vote voters november-elections socialist-or-democratic-nation political-confusion wild-mouse racism race-card-politics-white-house-snafu senators-from-maine obama-in-bar-harbor financial-regulations-act republican-turn coats change-in-america healthcare cash-for-clunkers gulf-coast-economy forget-the-gulf-coast-jobs oil-spill mass-confusion government-takeovers
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 4y

  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 4y

  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 3y

    By: Janine Turner | 12/20/11 6:39 AM
    [The Washington] Examiner Contributor

    Americans celebrated the 220th anniversary of the ratification of the Bill of Rights last week. This document is the cornerstone of our individual freedoms.

    The Bill of Rights was demanded by the Anti-Federalists, as a condition for their accepting the then-proposed Constitution. James Madison, however, believed no such document was necessary because the Constitution nowhere denied such rights. Putting them on paper, Madison feared, would provide a pretext for their re-interpretation to limit individual freedom.

    Though anxious to get the Constitution ratified, Madison promised they would be added to the Constitution as amendments, he drafted the Bill of Rights in 1789, and they were ratified by Congress and the states in 1791.

    Living in a time when the Constitution is either ignored or mis-interpreted, we should thank the Anti-Federalist for their perseverance. The clash of the Federalist and Anti-Federalists led to guarantees of liberties that have been envied throughout the world for over two centuries.

    Madison, ironically, believed, and rightly so, “Liberty is to faction, what air is to fire.” In this case, the clash of two factions produced an historic result.

    The Bill of Rights, especially the First Amendment, is the most widely recognized feature of the Constitution. Students across America, when asked about the Constitution, seemingly know nothing about any of its seven Articles, but they are quick to mention such First Amendment guarantees as freedom of speech, press, assembly and religion.

    John Adams said, “Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people.” Yet, in order to know when your personal freedoms are being infringed, you must understand the Bill of Rights.

    A timely case in point is the First Amendment provision that says “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishing of a religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…”

    Too many schools neglect teaching about the Constitution. As a result, many students, and their parents, do not understand their constitutional rights in this area and are silenced by a misreading of the First Amendment.

    The cultural elite and progressives have initiated a vastly successful campaign to intimidate students from exercising their uniquely American right to express religious beliefs in public schools.

    Courts affirm time and time again that the First Amendment guarantees students’ rights to discuss their religious beliefs openly in the classroom and campus as long as they aren’t disruptive. This includes saying “Merry Christmas,” handing out Christmas cards and gifts, and drawing religious symbols.

    The public schools, because they are government entities, however, cannot force a specific religion upon students, though it may teach about religion in the context of instruction about the tenets of multiple religions.

    Too many schools, however, still have intimidating policies that result from ideological considerations or constitutional ignorance. Dr. Charles C. Haynes, director of Religious Freedom Education Project, who travels the nation instructing schools on this matter, writes, “Memo to school officials: Divisive lawsuits and bitter conflicts might be avoided if you remember that students are not the government.”

    Knowledge is power. As the Bill of Rights is highlighted during this festive season that is rich with religion and religious holidays, it is helpful to know all the facts.

    Passions are persuasive. Our founding fathers consequently crafted an ingenious document that curbs ardent and misguided quests.

    Thus, Americans should put a Constitution in their children’s stocking and discuss their rights with them over the holiday break. A student cannot stand tall if he does not know it all.

    Examiner contributor Janine Turner is a longtime actress and talk radio show host on KLIF in Dallas. She is also founder and co-chairman, with Cathy Gillespie, of Constituting America, a non-profit foundation devoted to improving constitutional education in America.
    Posted at 8:20AM, 20 December 2011 PST (permalink | edit | close | make sticky | delete topic)
  • ROBERT HUFFSTUTTER 2y

    “If the representatives of the people betray their constituents, there is then no recourse left but in the exertion of that original right of self-defense which is paramount to all positive forms of government…” – Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist (#28)

    “(The Constitution preserves) the advantage of being armed which Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation… (Where) the governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.” –James Madison

    “The right of the people to keep and bear…arms shall not be infringed. A well-regulated militia, composed of the people, trained to arms, is the best and most natural defense of a free country…”
    –James Madison, I Annals of Congress 434 (June 8, 1789)

    “A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.” – George Washington

    “What country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance. Let them take arms.” – Thomas Jefferson

    “Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who didn’t.
    ” – Ben Franklin

    “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” – Thomas Jefferson

    “The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.”
    – Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers


    Read more: freedomoutpost.com/2013/01/when-politicians-demand-gun-co...
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