Dockside All-Star Hall of Fame, Festival International de Louisiane, Lafayette, April 29, 2018:
All-star musicians led by the Givers, a band that got its start in Lafayette, gathered at the end of 2018 Festival International de Louisiane to pay tribute to famed Dockside Studio, which is located on the banks of the Vermilion River in the nearby town of Maurice. Late in the afternoon April 29, 2018, studio owners Steve and Cezanne (Wish) Nails were on the side Scène LUS Internationale while Tiffany Lamson and Taylor Guarisco of the Givers opened the show and then introduced performances by Marc Broussard, Terrance Simien, Susan Cowsill and Vicki Peterson, Marcia Ball, Roddie Romero and Yvette Landry, and the Lost Bayou Ramblers. The show closed about 7 p.m. near sunset with everyone on stage including a host of other supporting musicians, among them, guitarist Dylan Nails, son of Steve and Wish Nails.

A large sign on the stage displayed the hashtag #NoBBP and the words “Okwa okchayo” (“water is life”), proclaiming opposition to the Bayou Bridge Pipeline construction project in the Atchafalaya Basin. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/LeauEstLaVie/

For more information about Dockside Studio go to www.docksidestudio.com/ or www.facebook.com/Dockside-Studio-145712543450/. Check out the latest on the Givers at www.facebook.com/giversmusic/

For the first time, I purchased a Bons Temps pass to the festival which, among several perks, allowed access to an area near the front of the stage. That area was fairly crowded with other pass holders, but I was much better off than last year when I wound up using my 80-400 mm lens with a teleconverter trying to aim around other festival goers packed in front of the stage. As in the past, the Parc International concrete stage was raised by an additional platform on which were scattered numerous sound monitors, blocking full view of the stage. A few of the credentialed photographers brought along small step ladders to stand on to get better shots. I tried raising the camera over my head, using the Nikon D850’s live view function to try to frame the shot. Live view seems to work reasonably well, but it can take a second or so to gain focus.

My Nikon D850 was back from warranty repairs (shutter wouldn’t fire the flash, lenses sometimes had to be mounted multiple times before autofocus would work). Most of the focusing problems I had for this Flickr set were my own fault, such as not compensating enough for the narrower focusing tolerance with the D850’s higher resolution and fumbling with autofocus settings which, at one point, I manage to switch to manuaI (I was pretty exhausted by then). When I mount lenses on my D850, I still sometimes have to twist the lens a second or third time. Whatever Nikon Repairs did seems to have improved the problem, but I can’t automatically assume the focus will work after I mount a lens the way I can with all of the other Nikons I’ve owned. One definite advantage of the D850’s high resolution: if the focus is good, details in cropped portions of wide shots of the entire stage are still sharp.

For a listing of Cajun and Zydeco bands and Mardi Gras photos included on these Flickr pages, go to www.cajunzydecophotos.com or www.cajunzydecophotos.com/mobile.
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