TWO GEISHA PLAY AN EXCITING GAME OF GO in OLD JAPAN -- ZZZZZzzzzzzz....!

Miss Plum Blossom (on the left) and Miss Peach Blossom have been kneeling in this position for five hours without a bathroom break.

 

Peach blossom started the game, and it has already been an hour since placing her black stone # 8 on the board.

 

Plum Blossom, who happens to be the only idiot-savant Geisha in Yokohama, understands that, according to combinatorial game theory terms, GO is a "zero sum, perfect information, partisan, deterministic strategy game". She has spent the last hour studying the board, considering all possible outcomes of all possible moves --- extrapolated to the last stone --- and now, quietly puts her hand into the rosewood bowl to deftly pick up her eighth white piece.

 

Peach Blossom, who knows she doesn't have a snowball's chance in Hell of winning this game against Plum Blossom, has fallen fallen fast asleep....zzzzzzzzzzzz......

 

EXTRAPOLATING THE POSSIBILITIES

 

".........The number of spaces on the board is large --- more than five times the spaces on a chess board. On most turns there are many more possible moves in Go than in chess. Throughout most of the game, the number of legal moves stays at around 150–250 per turn, and rarely goes below 50 (in chess, the average number of moves is 37).

 

Because an exhaustive computer program for Go must calculate and compare every possible legal move in each "ply" (player turn), its ability to work out favorable lines of play is sharply reduced when there are a large number of possible moves. Most computer game algorithms, such as those for chess, compute several moves in advance.

 

For the game of GO, with an average of 200 available moves through most of the game, for a computer to calculate its next move by exhaustively anticipating the next four moves of each possible play (two of its own and two of its opponent's), it would have to consider more than 320 billion (3.2*10^11) possible combinations. To exhaustively calculate the next eight moves, would require computing 512 quintillion (5.12*10^20) possible combinations.

 

As of June 2008, the most powerful supercomputer in the world, IBM's "Roadrunner" distributed cluster, can sustain 1.02 petaflops. At this rate, even given an exceedingly low estimate of 10 flops required to assess the value of one play of a stone, IBM's Roadrunner Computer would require 138 hours --- more than five days --- to assess all possible combinations of the next eight moves in order to make a single play......"

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_(board_game)

 

It only took Plum Blossom 58 minutes and 32 seconds.

 

 

SEE A GRANDMASTER GETTING HIS ASS WHIPPED :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/6094434951/in/photostream

9,677 views
50 faves
26 comments
Taken on June 3, 2009