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Six Methods of Microphone Avoidance by Margaret Price and Amanda J. Hedrick | by mirrormargaret
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Six Methods of Microphone Avoidance by Margaret Price and Amanda J. Hedrick

“Six Methods of Microphone Avoidance: Or, What Not to Say When Someone Asks You to Use a Mic" is a comic collaboratively conceived, designed, and illustrated by Margaret Price and Amanda J. Hedrick.

 

DESCRIPTION. The comic is a circle with six wedge-shaped panels. In panel 1, a bearded person wearing glasses says, “I don’t see anyone deaf here” while audience members respond, “That’s … not how it works.” In panel 2, a person with curly hair wearing a dress says, “The cord doesn’t reach!” In panel 3, a tall person with broad shoulders says, “I was raised in a military family. I’ve got a loud voice.” In panel 4, a speaker says, “A little phallic for my taste” while an audience member says in frustration, “Oh good–jokes.” In panel 5, a balding person wearing a tie says, “Thanks, but I’m trying to quit! Ha ha!” In panel 6, a long-haired person at a podium says, “You can all hear me, right?” while audience members say to one another, “What’d they say?” and “Did you catch that?”

 

CONTEXT. This comic was published on the site "Composing Access" (u.osu.edu/composingaccess) on January 11, 2020. Accompanying text from Composing Access reads as follows: "This comic demonstrates with humor the many reasons why people might try to avoid using microphones, and the reasons why microphones are important. Even those of us who have been 'taught to project' may not realize how our voices come across; for example, if some of your audience members are using hearing aids, it’s likely that your projected vowels will blast into their ears, while your consonants will be almost indistinguishable. Check out Jessie B. Ramey’s essay 'A Note From Your Colleagues With Hearing Loss' (www.chronicle.com/article/A-Note-From-Your-Colleagues/245916) for more on this topic and a list of best practices."

 

INVITATION. Please visit Composing Access (u.osu.edu/composingaccess) and join us in our work to help make events more accessible and comfortable for everyone! The site is run on 100% volunteer effort, and we warmly welcome the contribution of materials to add to the site.

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Uploaded on January 11, 2020