Antelope Horn Milkweed - a Texas Wild flower

Best viewed large. This tiny Antelope Horn (Asclepias viridis) flower is a native Texas wild flower and was found in the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in South Austin. This unusual green flower is only about 3/4" across and very unusual as it was the first flower to erupt from something similar to a small head of cabbage, but with pentagon shaped pieces instead of leaves. While it is considered to be a member of the milkweed family which is considered to be poisonous, according to some sources, it has been used by early natives and settlers to make different types of medicines.


If you look closely, particularly in the large view, you can see a perfect tiny five-pointed green star set in a field of white in the very center of the flower. The Antelope Horn flower probably should have been considered for designation as the Official flower of the State of Texas, but maybe no one had a magnifiying glass back then, or maybe they were swayed by the beautify of the fields of bluebonnets strewn across the fields of central Texas. But this flower should at least get honorable mention for the perfect star it displays for its native Lone Star State.

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Taken on April 15, 2010