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The Dale Abbey Arch pictured by Drone - near dusk - November 18th 2016. | by Lenton Sands
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The Dale Abbey Arch pictured by Drone - near dusk - November 18th 2016.

DALE ABBEY - November 18th 2016.

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Today, the only easily recognisable relict feature of the Dale Abbey ruins is its empty 40-foot-high chancel window, an impressive feature, being forty feet ground to keystone in height and sixteen feet in width.

 

Victorian excavations revealed the Abbey to have possessed transepts of one hundred feet in length, a crossing tower, a cloister eighty-five feet square and a nave of unknown length.

 

It was the camera mounted upon a drone that took the above image of the ancient window arch of the former Dale Abbey, close to dusk and before darkening fields.

Throughout the centuries before the Abbey's destuction by men of King Henry V111, the monks' strict routines had marked the tempo of local life . Each and every day the Abbey bells would have rung out across the surrounding fields and woodland.

 

Further -

Another Lenton Sands flickr picture is a sketch showing the Abbey ruins in 1727, it suggests its structure before King Henry V111 destruction. As a remarkable historic record, the picture deserves some scrutiny. The sketch was first made public in 1880 as a folded page insert in a book concerning the History of Ilkeston by Edwin Truman and others.

 

Dale Abbey was originally known as the " Abbey de Parco Stanli," meaning Stanley Park Abbey ]

 

Cannons were priests and deacons who lived like monks - whilst following the ways of St. Augustine, who was born in November of the year 354, and died in August of 430 . Augustine had sought to establish a church wherein its members would live their days in close Christ-like service, being reliant upon the mercy of God, and by the charity and offerings of the faithfuI . They being without regular salaries, that which they got was distributed proportionately among themselves according to their needs. A strict rule determined the men would dine and sup together. No woman was allowed to enter their house.

 

A monastery, or abbey, was a complex of buildings and facilities necessary for the needs of its inhabitants monastic life of prayer and devout submission to God and the Word of Christ. The wealthiest establishments possessed facilities that the poorer ones could not have afforded or have had a need of .Many were built on the fertile low lying land near water . As fish was an important food, fishponds were dug and established wherever possible. .

 

Abbeys were, and remain, the abode of communities of monks or nuns. They originated among the early Christian hermits of the Egyptian desert as a cluster of separate huts built around that of an anchorite of distinguished piety. The name signifies the institution as well as the building.

 

As the monastic system became organized, there arose a form of architecture suited to its needs. The principle adopted by the Benedictines, that an abbey should be entirely self-contained, led to great complexity in the many thousands of buildings erected by that order throughout Europe. Building features included the church, the centre of the whole monastic life; the chapter-house ; the pisalis, or calefactory, the common room of the monks; the refectory, or dining-room ; dormitories ; cloisters ; buildings devoted to the reception of guests; the almonry, where the needs of the poor were relieved; infirmary and physician’s residence ; library and writing-room ; schools for novices and children; besides bake-house, brewery, workshops, stables, and farm buildings.

The gardens were filled with vegetables, fruits, and medicinal herbs; and the whole abbey was surrounded by a wall. Such British abbeys are, for example, "Westminster, Canterbury, York, Tewkesbury (Benedictine), Durham, Fountains, Kirkstall (Cistercian), Bolton, Bristol, and Holyrood (Augustinian). The first English abbey was founded at Bangor in the year 560.

King Henry VIII began his suppression of the kingdom's monastic foundations in 1525, by ordering the closure of the smaller ones. By 1538 he had abolished, or had ordered the surrendering (the closure) of all the institutions, including the most wealthy and powerful ones.

 

 

In 1162, in the seventh year of the reign of King Henry the Second a body of nine Augustinian Canons were brought to Dale in Derbyshire by the then Lord of the manor there, Geoffrey de Salicosa Mare .

The men were to live in what was then a wet and wild, deep valley hollow known as Depedale.. It lay in the vicinities of the villages West Hallam, Heanor and Ilkeston. They had come from New-house, in Lincolnshire for the the purpose of establishing a community dedicated to monastic life. Theirs was an extreme task, and one that eventually became impossible as sustained life and work in Depedale proved too harsh. Nevertheless, decades later, after other attempt's had also failed there, a community did become established.

Those first monks of Dale had been formerly of the Augustinian order . They were replaced by a number from Calke Abbey, men who later still were themselves replaced (or perhaps supplemented) by Premonstratensian canons came from Tupholme and finally, more from Welbeck. Depedale (Dale) was an isolated hollow. Its abbey was to be built amidst wild thick woodlands, therefor the monks initially lived very hard , and hungry, lives . It was only as their body gained property, rents and tithe monies, was its future made sure.

The Abbey eventually owned some twentyfour thousand acres of land.

 

 

As the men in Depedale began their task, England was Violent and Lawless and its population falling .

The reign of King Stephen was from December 26th., 1135, until October 25th.,1154.

The years of the reign of Stephen were terrible for many of his subjects in England : a time in which 1115 castles were built . "The period was violent and lawless as the owners and occupiers of the castles which then abounded in England rampaged. One historian summarised the terrible time : " Castles abounded in every part of England; each defending, or rather depopulating, its neighbourhood. The knights of the castle seized the sheep and cattle in the fields, sparing neither churches nor cemeteries. They stripped the cottages even of their straw, and imprisoned their miserable inhabitants. They exhausted the property of their captives by their ransoms; and many perished in the torments that were applied to compel them to redeem themselves. Tortures were inflicted, both to gratify, revenge, and amass wealth."

 

Dale Abbey was costly to build. Though quarry stone could be had, money could not.

The hermit of the cave had been long dead before the benevolence of Lady Matilda of Stanli made the "manor of Stanleye with its parish" to the canons of Dale.

 

It also acquired advowsons of the churches of Heanor, Ilkeston, and Kirk Hallam.

 

The Abbey was built of stately dimensions, having several large windows on each side, and one large chancel window at its east end . Today that window still stands though long ruined and empty.

 

 

Then," Richard de Sandiacre," (at a later date) gave, for the love of God and salvation of my soul, to the canons of Dale, a piece of land in " my wood of Kirk Hallam," " being six perches in width, together with the quarry in it, extending from the abbot’s ditch to the east of the said quarry, as far as the wood of the Canons of Dale, for quarrying, ditching, and enclosing," as they shall choose. From this time Dale Abbey increased in possessions and riches, under the rule of eighteen successive Abbots, so that at the time of the Dissolution in I539, when it was surrendered by the Abbot and sixteen Canons, its yearly value was estimated at £144 4s, a sum equal to nearly *£3000 in these day.

 

The original Depedale church, a stone construction that was later developed and expanded to be Dale Abbey, was built by Austin Cannons . Considerable further building (from about the year 1200) created a fine structure of stately dimensions that possessed "Early English," "Early English Transition," and '"Decorated" styles of architecture, plus some later additions made at the latter end of the fifteenth century.

 

First in a series of events which turned the poverty of Depedale to prosperity was the wedding of Margery, the daughter of the man that had been touched by the hermit’s rags and skins, and Serlo de Grendon, - a soldier ardent in warfare, owner of many a manor, and a member of an important wealthy family. With his wife he received half the manor of Okebroke. . Then was Serlo’s gift of part of his wife’s dowry to " a friend who was also his spiritual mother in that she had promised for him at the sacred font long years before." To her Serlo gave "the place of Depedale, and all the land between the path which leads from Boyhawe toward the west to the Colkeysike and Brunesbroc ;" and there she lived in a mansion " where there is now a pond, at the bottom of which our fathers found many cut stones which formerly belonged to the said mansion." This "venerable matron" persuaded her godson to give Depedale to the monastery of Kalke, because " God, who orders everything, willed to exalt Depedale yet more gloriously."

The canons of Kalke sent five of their number to live in their new possession. Their names were Humfrey, who was their leader; Nicholas and Simon, who had both been fellow—students at Paris with Serlo’s son William; "and two others whose names have escaped my memory." These were joined by the godmother’s son, Richard, who had been instructed in sacred letters and ordained priest in order that he might say mass in his mother’s chapel of Depedale, " Having taken root in the said place, the aforesaid canons, strengthened by God, built for themselves a church at great expense, and also other buildings." Moreover, Humphrie, their prior, went to Rome and obtained very valuable privileges " .

 

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In Queen Victoria's Kinder Times - as the Railways began to be built across the land - Long after the years of Dale Abbey, a traveller of Queen Victoria's time recalled Depedale and the countryside about as he then saw it : -

 

"Depedale, better known as Dale Abbey, has no connection with the limestone region more commonly associated with Derbyshire, but may be taken as a type of the (Robin Hood) scenery frequent in the outer margin of the country; and, indeed, in several parts of the Midland district. It lies in the neighbourhood of the Nottingham border, some eight miles to the east of Derby, among the low hills that drain into the valley of the Erewash. Beyond Derby, the road mounts rapidly from the level meadows by the river Derwent till an upland plateau is gained, over which it runs through richly-wooded scenery, at times seeming almost a continuous park. It commands lovely views over the valley of the Derwent and across a shelving, gently—undulating region toward the south, where mile after mile of rolling fields and woodlands stretches away till at last the lines of the Charnwood Forest hills rise blue in the distance.

 

At length, as the view begins to widen toward the east, we reach the edge of a declivity, and Depedale lies spread out before us. It is a silent, world—forgotten spot—a little village, with crooked lanes, and houses scattered about hap-hazard and almost smothered in orchards. Its history may be briefly told, as it is gathered from the chronicle of one of the Canons of the Abbey, Thomas de Musca, who lived in the fifteenth century; it also forms the subject of a ballad by the Howitts. About the beginning of the thirteenth century, there lived in Derby one Cornelius, a baker,. who, like his namesake of Caesarea, served the Lord zealously in prayer and almsgiving. Falling asleep on a certain day, the Virgin Mary appeared to him in a vision, and bade him, if he would be perfect, leave all his worldly goods and betake himself to Depedale, there to serve her and her Son in solitude and prayer. Thither he wandered, guided by an accidental direction, which he received as a sign from heaven, and, in a little cave scooped out from the rock, worshiped God in fasting and prayers night and day. The Lord of Ockebrook, on his return from Normandy, came upon the recluse while he was out hunting; and, being moved by compassion at his miserable state, granted the spot to him, and gave him tithe of the mill of Burgh for his support. After discovering a spring in the lower part of the valley, and so securing a supply of water, from the want of which he at first had suffered much, he built there an oratory; and, after many sufferings, d

 

Every day the Canons of Dale walked in procession around their churchyard. Their lives were guided by formal written rules contained within a book that had been given a striking frontispiece , a representation of two winged boys carrying a skull of startling appearance, having six conspicuous front teeth, three in each jaw. . . .

 

 

Thankfully, it eventually happened that, " the Lady Matilda de Salicosa—Mara," in spite of her womanhood, was allowed to enter the sacred precints of Dale, because the noble matron, being old and full of days, and knowing that the time of her summons from this world ( ie her death ) was swiftly drawing near, desired to persuade God to give her a happy exit from this vale of tears by means of " the prayers of such holy men" as the canons. Lady Matilda, and her husband, they being nine years married, had no children and wanting some, made the "manor of Stanleye with its parish" to the canons of Dale, in order that " God, the most High, the rewarder of good deeds, considering the pious devotion of our humility, may grant to us the delight of being blessed with the children we long for," and also that He, " in return for this our gift, may grant to us the happiness of eternal life."

 

The Hymn, Salve Regina . . .

Hail, holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,

hail our life, our sweetness and our hope.

To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve;

to thee do we send up our sighs,

mourning and weeping in this valley of tears.

Turn then, most gracious advocate,

thine eyes of mercy toward us;

and after this our exile,

show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus.

 

 

By that,the 1899 "History of Ilkeston" plainly observes, reasonably, that the Canons of Dale, " a community of celibates, owed its foundation to a childless couple who were desiring a son to inherit their name ." It further comments that the first object of their gifting having failed, it was natural that the lady should 'appeal to the canons to do their best to procure the fulfilment of the second '.

 

The Baker of Derby became the First Hermit of Dale - then described as Depedale .

As a folk tale and song : the story of the baker of Derby passed down the years .

Truman's History invites a reader to Imagine a scene within a small cottage at evening, where a mother and her family are gathered together . Quote: " And now, as she tarries with them a while, they gather round their aged " mother" " on a certain holy day," and she tells them a tale, the story of how, like St. Norbert of old to his valley of Premontré, a certain baker of Derby first came to the valley of Dale, in the endeavour to make himself perfect, and so to earn "the kingdom of love and joy and eternal bliss which God has prepared for those who love him." The baker had for many years distributed to the poor in alms every Saturday, " for the love of God and the Holy Virgin," all the profits of his baking for the week, except what he needed for food and clothing for himself and his family. Such charity was rewarded. "It happened that on a certain day in autumn, when he had given himself up to the midday sleep, the blessed Virgin Mary appeared to him in a dream, saying, ‘Thy alms are accepted before my son and me, but now if thou wilt be perfect, leave all that thou hast and go to Depedale, and there thou shalt serve my son and me’ " by living all by yourself; and " when thou shalt have finished thy llife on earth, thou shalt inherit" the above mentioned kingdom. So, leaving the poor of Derby to wait in vain for the doles by which he had kept them from starvation, the baker straightway went forth without saying goodbye to his friends and relations, and walked to Stanley, without the ghost of an idea of whereabouts Depedale might be.

In the middle of the village he overheard a woman telling a girl to drive her calves to Depedale, and, "believing that this word had been spoken to him in grace," he followed her and them to " a marshy , place of fearful aspect" far distant from even any hut. There he scooped out a cave in the rocky side of the mountain, " a very small dwelling," which every Ilkestonian has visited, as every inhabitant of Knaresborough has visited the similar hermit’s cave near that town. For there were hermits enough and to spare; but the baker of Derby was one of a superior class. The generality, at least at a later date, were "lewed eremytes that look full humble to gain men’s alms in hope to sit at even by the hot coles, and after drinking deep, to draw themselves to bed, lyving in ydelnesse and in ese." But the fact that the taverns were crowded with dirty hypocrites was a proof that the standard hermit was by no means a despicable creature, however untidy in his habits, else the country folk would not have paid people for pretending to be like him when they were not. Genuine hermits used to spend most of their time in fighting evil spirits, who, thinking not unnaturally that they must have a great deal of spare time on their hands, used to worry them nearly out of their senses. They frequently came to them armed with four claws on each hand, one-third the length of their arms, and five on each foot—eighteen in all, and wearing nothing but a pair of bathing drawers and two long ears. But, formidable though they were, they were not invincible. St. Norbert, when pending a night in prayer about this time, was thus visited when he was in the act of holding his jaw up with his hand because he was so dreadfully tired.* He heard his visitor crying scornfully, " Yah l yah l what

eat work do you think you are ever likely to do when you can’t hold out for a single night ?" " You are liar from the beginning," replied the saint; " who do you think is going to believe you now ?" " At this the evil spirit fled away in confusion." So it was with our Derby ex-baker. As "he served God, day and night, in hunger and thirst, in cold and in meditation," trying to become perfect by eating less than was good for him, " the cunning old enemy of the painted windows in the cloister of Dale Abbey told the story of how St. Robert, the hermit of Knaresborough, and son of the or of York, slew the deer which would not let him repeat his psalms in peace—most hermits made a point of repeating the entire Psalter

day—and how the keepers complained to the king, and how the king told St. Robert he might have as much land for himself as he could plough with a yoke of deer, and how nicely the deer did the ploughing, just as if they had been doing nothing else all their lives."

 

 

Cannons were priests and deacons who lived like monks. It was St. Augustine who first thought of them. " He made of his episcopal palace a community of clerks who served his church. Those who had anything were obliged to distribute it to the poor, or to get rid of

somehow or other. They waited for the mercy of God by the charity of the Church and by the offerings of the faithfuI," instead of stipulating for regular salaries, and what they received was distributed among them according to their needs. According to strict rule the men would dine and sup together. No woman was allowed to enter the house.

 

Today the only clearly visible Abbey ruin feature is its 40-foot-high chancel window - it being sixteen feet wide, and forty feet from the ground to its keystone .

Victorian excavations revealed the church to have possessed transepts of one hundred feet in length, a crossing tower, a cloister eightyfive feet square and a nave of unknown length. Some of the remains of the building can be found in houses around the village.

The last Abbot of Dale Abbey, John Bede, died in 1540.

 

When, after its dissolution, Sir Francis Pole of Radbourne took possession of Dale Abbey its furnishings and fittings were sold or stripped out. Some were installed in nearby churches. Morley Church became home to some of the stained and painted glass, floor tiles and an entire porchway. The ornately carved font cover was installed in Radbourne Church while Chaddesden received a window frame. In 1884 the Abbey font eventually was returned to Dale , being placed in All Saints Church . The slabs upon which the canons walked for so many centuries can be found in the grounds of the church at the Moravian Settlement at Ockbrook

.

At the time of its forced yet none-violent surrender, Dale Abbey was thought to be of stately dimensions, it having several large windows on each side, and one large chancel window at the east end . It had been founded in the year 1204.

Its surrender to the crown's agent was forced in 1538 by which time its revenues were estimated at £144 4s. per annum.

 

A historian named Willis writes Dale Abbey was surrendered by its last abbot, John Staunton, together with sixteen monks. However according to the commissioners’ accounts of that date it was a person named John Bede was the last abbot. The commissioners awarded the abbot John Bede a pension of £26 13s. 4d., and the monks various smaller pensions. The commissioners counted the total number of monks to be eighteen .

On its last day the Abbey's period of government (authority) had been exactly three hundred and twelve years , six weeks and one day .

Thereafter as the years passed the former Abbey land was subject to many changes of ownership . Upon its surrender to the Crown a certain Francis Pole, Esq., took possession of the site and demesnes, as lessee [ almost certainly for the Crown ] and purchased the altar, crucifix, organ, gravestones and and all the live and dead stock. In the year 1538, the abbey clock was sold for six shillings ; the iron, glass, paving and grave stones, for a total of eighteen pounds. The former Abbey's six great bells , which weighed 47 cwt. , were also disposed of - but for what price or by what arrangement is not known,

In 1554, he ( Francis Pole ) was granted (ie given) the abbey as his fee, that is as a payment to him for his services as lessee .It then being his property , In that same year he conveyed it ( sold it ) to Sir John Port , one of the Justices of the King’s Bench.

Thereafter , Dorothy, one of Sir John's co-heiresses, was left it by his will and by the law of that time brought it to her husband, Sir George Hastings.

Sir Henry Willoughby, of Risley, then purchased the estate of the representative of Sir George Hastings, who was afterwards Earl of Huntingdon, and died in 1605.

Sir Henry Willoughby having left three daughters, co-heiresses, one of whom left no issue, the manor of Dale and the abbey demesnes were held in moieties by the noble family of Grey, and that of A Dewes , into which the other co-heiresses married. One moiety.of the estate was purchased in 1716, by the trustees of Philip the then Earl of Chesterfield, of Sir Simon Dewes, for his BOD Alexander, father of the first Earl of Stanhope.

[ Thereby it came to be that Lord Stanhope was the land's owner at the time of the Abbey site excavation which was commenced, under the auspices of the Derbyshire Archaeological and Natural History Society in 1878.]

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THE HERMITAGE OF DALE was a cave, cut in sandstone rock just a short distance from the old Abbey. It was made a basic, yet comfortable enough dwelling, it having a large in the rock, possessing,.originally, a rude doorway a Dale was endowed by the lord or lady of a manor. in return for prayers for their family.

 

Traditionally, hermitages have been located in caves and huts, often in the desert or woods, sometimes abutting monastery buildings of a cenobitic community when there was an exchange of labour and provisions

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The September 1878 [ partial ] Excavations at Dale Abbey .

 

In September, 1878, an excavation of the foundations of Dale Abbey was begun and continued into August, 1879 when it was ended "having met with unexpected success". The Abbey ground plan was thought largely complete though not concerning its south and west sides .The work had commenced, under the auspices of the Derbyshire Archaeological and Natural History Society. Though some trial holes were permitted to be dug at the south side none were permitted at the west owing to the unwillingness of the tenant there.

 

It appeared that there were six altars to the church, viz., the High Altar, and those dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, our Lady of Pity, the Holy Rood, S. Margaret, and S.Werburgh. Of these the High Altar and two others remained; the position of two others was indicated. The whole church appeared to be of early English date. One of the most valuable discoveries was a large portion of the nave pavement with the tiles disposed for the arrangement of processions. A remarkable effigy was also found, but opinions dilfer as to whom it represents, whether a canon, a cantor, a lector, abbot, or prior.

Some distance beneath this efligy was found an oaken coffin, and beneath the body which was in this coffin were a large number of leaves still green and pliant, although a lapse of 500 years must have ensued since they were plucked from the tree.

 

Beneath two incised slabs, interments were also found. A west doorway ol great richness was unearthed, and also a rnemorial stone of an abbot. It bore a richly sculptured cross, by the side of which was cut a pastoral staff, as significatory of the rank of the old Premonstratensian prelate.

 

The lower courses of a fine staircase at the junction of the choir and north transept that lead up to the central tower were exposed with numerous especially good encaustic tiles of heraldic and set patterns. Also discovered were fragments of painted glass and beautifully carved crochets of Early English work.

Of the original Church, built by the Austin Cannons, there are hardly any remains, beyond some fragments of incised slabs, and perhaps, two or three bases of piers. The existing buildings appear to have been commenced about the year 1200, and there are examples of the "Early English," "Early English Transition," and '"Decorated" styles, with some later additions of the latter end of the fifteenth century.

 

[ Doctor Stukeley's plan shows an aisleless cruciform church, with two contiguous chapels on the south side of the choir- the cloister to the south, bounded by the transept and a large

oblong chamber on the east ; the parlour, refectory, and kitchen on the south, and sundry offices, with the Prior`s lodging, on the west.

The excavations, however, have proved that the doctor's survey is inaccurate.]

 

 

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After the 1878 - 1879 archaeological excavations upon the Abbey's site , Earl Stanhope, its owner, stated that he intended to preserve it and to erect a building to serve as a museum.

 

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Manuscript : read the following ancient text which is in old style English with care . . .

 

One of the most interesting records extant, relating to the "Abbey de Parco Stanli" or Dale Abbey," is the one contained in the valuable MS. volume, numbered 172, in the Augmentation Office Records. This account contains the inventories of eleven religious houses, taken in 1538, under the direction of Dr. (afterwards Sir) Thomas Legh and William

Cavendish, the King’s Commissioners for the dissolution, and among these are three or four Derbyshire and Staffordshire houses.

From a copy of one of these—the Inventory of Dale Abbey-—we make the following extracts " : Dale Priory ( Abbey ) , Derbyshire . Hereafter folowyth all such parcells of implements or householde stuife, corne, catell, ornaments of the churche and such

other lyke founde within the late monastery ther at the time of the dissolucon of the same house, soulde by the Kinges Commissioners to Fraunces Pole, esquire, the xxiiij day of October in the xxxth yere of our soveraigne lorde Kyng Henry the viijth..

The Churche : At the hygh aulter a table of woode paynted, ij candlestykes of brasse, a lampe, the seates in the quier, acrucyfyx, Mary and John, a payre of organs, xxs, on the

ryght hand of the quier ij aulters wyth ij tables of allebastervjs. : a grate of yron abowte the Founder [a railing or screenof wood or metal round the tomb of the founder] and tym-

ber worke ther viijs. ; the rode alter in the church and a rodether ijs. ; in our Lady Chapell a table of alebaster and certen setes and woode ther vs.: in the lytell Chapell of our

Lady a table of alebaster wyth an imaj of our Lady ther iijs. ;the particion of tymber in the body of the Churche xxd. ;the clock ther vjs. ; the roffes, ieron, glasse, pavying stones,

and grave stones, and pavying stones in the church xviijli.The Dorter : there ys soulde for vijs vjd.The Vestry : ij tynacles of blacke satten a cope of the same with albes thereto belonging ; a sewte of whyte sylke with a cope to the same spotted with blue sterres; a sewte of blake sylke viij oulde copes viij oulde altar clothes as soulde for xls.

The Cloyster; The roffes, ieron, glass, pavyng stones and the seats there soulde for vi li.

The Kechyn: A brasse pott in a furnes; iij brasse potts; iij lytell pannes; iij spyttes ; a payr of coberds ; j pott chayen ; ij cressetts; j grydyren; a payr of tongs; a morter with a pestell ; xl platers, dysshes and saucers, sould for xls.The Brewhonse ; ij leads ; a masshyng fatte ; a malte arke . The Bysshops Chamber: An oulde fether bede; an oulde coveryng; a boulster; an oulde tester; an oulde henging -— xijs.Catell at the Monastery : viij oxen soulde for iiijli. ; xv. yonge bullokes, at iiijs. the peoe, lxs. ; xx pygges soulde fore xiijs iiijd. ; ealvys soulde for xxs; horses there soulde for xxs — ixli. xiijs iiijd.

[Then follow the remainder of the ‘ oatell and also the grayne ~soulde’ at Bayhaye Graunge and Ockbroke Graungaj Wayenes at the Monastery : ij waynes soulde for vjs viijd, ij

oulde waynes soulde for vjs viijd.

Hereafter folowyth all such parcells of implements or house holde stuffe, corne, catell, ornaments of the churche and such other lyke founde within the late monastery ther at the time of the dissolucon of the same house, soulde by the Kinges Commissioners to Fraunces Pole, esquire, the xxiiij day of October in the xxxth yere of our soveraigne lorde Kyng Henry the viijth.The Churche : At the hygh aulter a table of woode paynted, ij

candlestykes of brasse, a lampe, the seates in the quier, a crucyfyx, Mary and John, a payre of organs, xxs, on the ryght hand of the quier ij aulters wyth ij tables of allebaster

vjs. : a grate of yron abowte the Founder [a railing or screenof wood or metal round the tomb of the founder] and tymber worke ther viijs. ; the rode alter in the church and a rode

ther ijs. ; in our Lady Chapell a table of alebaster and certen setes and woode ther vs.: in the lytell Chapell of our Lady a table of alebaster wyth an imaj of our Lady ther iijs. ;

the particion of tymber in the body of the Churche xxd. ; the clock ther vjs. ; the roffes, ieron, glasse, pavying stones,and grave stones, and pavying stones in the church xviijli.

The Dorter : there ys soulde for vijs vjd. The Vestry: ij tynacles of blacke satten a cope of the same with albes thereto belonging ; a sewte of whyte sylke with a

cope to the same spotted with blue sterres; a sewte of blake sylke viij oulde copes viij oulde altar clothes as soulde for xls.ety was purchased, 1778, of the Earl of Stamford.

 

[A list of ‘ rewards gyven to the abbott and covent ther at ther departure’ is next given, and is followed by a number of payments in sums varying from 5s. to 20s.—— in all, £15 9s. Sd., V including Sir William Cooke, the parish pryst of Stanley, in `' reward 20s. ; John Tebaulde and his wyffe xijs., and John of the Henhouse, viijs.]

 

Pencizms and Stypends appoynted and allotted to the late Abbott and Convent of the seid late Monastery by the foreseid Commissioners to

John Bede, late Abbott . . . .xxvj1i. xiijs. iiijd.

Richard Wheteley, prior . . . . . . cvjs. viijd.

John Cadman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .cvjs. viijd.

Richard Hawslon . . . . . . . . . . . cvjs. viijd.

Thomas Bagshaw . . . . . . . . . . .cvjs. viijjd.

 

William Smyth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .cvjs. viijjd. John Banks . . . . .. . . . . ... . . . . .cs.

John Shemold . . . . . . . . . . . . . lxvjs. viijjd.

George Coke . . . . . . . . . . . . .. es. ff

Robert Hervey . . . . . .. . . . . . . cxvis. viijd. Y

Rauffe Heryson . . . . . . . . . .. . cs. QQ

Robert Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . ..lxvjs. viijjd.

Jamis Cheryholme . . . . . .

The partial archeological excavations of the site of Dale Abbey - 1878 - 1879 .

 

After the 1878 - 1879 archaeological excavations upon the Abbey's site , Earl Stanhope, its owner, stated that he intended to preserve it and to erect a building to serve as a museum.

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An 1875 photo at the Hermit's Cave. The man's name was Wood.

 

www.flickr.com/photos/lenton_sands/30971982551/in/datepos...

 

 

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Uploaded on November 20, 2016