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Image from page 205 of "Decorative textiles; an illustrated book on coverings for furniture, walls and floors, including damasks, brocades and velvets, tapestries, laces, embroideries, chintzes, cretonnes, drapery and furniture trimmings, wall papers, car | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 205 of "Decorative textiles; an illustrated book on coverings for furniture, walls and floors, including damasks, brocades and velvets, tapestries, laces, embroideries, chintzes, cretonnes, drapery and furniture trimmings, wall papers, car

Identifier: decorativetextil1918hunt

Title: Decorative textiles; an illustrated book on coverings for furniture, walls and floors, including damasks, brocades and velvets, tapestries, laces, embroideries, chintzes, cretonnes, drapery and furniture trimmings, wall papers, carpets and rugs, tooled and illuminated leathers

Year: 1918 (1910s)

Authors: Hunter, George Leland, 1867-1927

Subjects: Embroidery Tapestry Textile fabrics Lace and lace making Wallpaper Decoration and ornament

Publisher: Philadelphia and London, J. B. Lippincott company Grand Rapids, The Dean-Hicks company

Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners

  

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e designs except as embellished by conventional dragons.During the last half of the seventeenth century, scrolls began toreplace the straight lines, and these in turn were replaced in theeighteenth century by naturalistic leaves and flowers. Often on the field of Chinese rugs appear Chinese lions or liondogs playing with a ball. Sometimes all the twelve animals whichstand in China for the signs of the Zodiac are introduced in the field,or border of rugs. These signs are: the ox, the tiger, the hare, thedragon, the serpent, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the cat, the dog,the bear, the rat. Important to the student and the dealer in Chinese rugs is aknowledge of Chinese colour symbolism, black standing for water,mercury, iron, etc.; green for wood, tin, etc. Colours Elements Metals Planets Directions Seasons Black Water Iron Mercury North Winter Green Wood Tin Jupiter South Spring Red Fire Copper Mars East Summer White Metal Silver Venus West Autumn Yellow Earth Gold Saturn Middle 177

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Ph CHINESE AND BOKHARA RUGS The warp of Chinese rugs is almost always of cotton. Conse-quently the end selvages and the fringes are unimportant, as cottondoes not make interesting selvages or fringes. Of course some of thevery finest rugs, those with woollen as well as those with silk pile havea silk warp. In Chinese rugs of the seventeenth century, the spinningof the wool is less regular, the texture apt to be coarser, the colourtones apt to be darker than in those made since. Especially frequentare dark browns that have often rotted away the wool because of thedestructive quality of the dye. The designs of seventeenth centuryChinese rugs are more geometrical and rectilinear than those of theeighteenth century. They are also distinctly archaic, especially thoseof the first half of the century, belonging to the Ming period. In the last half of the seventeenth century the influence ofPersian rugs begins to make itself apparent in Chinese rugs. Alsoin the last half of the seventeenth an

  

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Taken circa 1918