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Image from page 131 of "History of the Alleghany Evangelical Lutheran synod of Pennsylvania, together with a topical handbook of the Evangelical Lutheran church, its ancestry, origin and development" (1918) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 131 of "History of the Alleghany Evangelical Lutheran synod of Pennsylvania, together with a topical handbook of the Evangelical Lutheran church, its ancestry, origin and development" (1918)

Identifier: historyofallegha01carn

Title: History of the Alleghany Evangelical Lutheran synod of Pennsylvania, together with a topical handbook of the Evangelical Lutheran church, its ancestry, origin and development

Year: 1918 (1910s)

Authors: Carney, W. H. Bruce

Subjects:

Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa., Printed for the Synod by the Lutheran publication society

Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library

  

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of Gross Henners-dorf, Saxony, near Herrnhut, the home of the Moravians, wherehe was pastor of the mother of Count Zinzendorf, their founderand leader. This experience served him well in Pennsylvanialater in dealing with the Moravians here. At supper, as guest of Dr. Francke at Halle, September 6,1741. the latter called his attention to the call to the dispersedLutherans in America and proposed to him to make trial of a 111 PIONEER LUTHERANISM IN PENNSYLVANIA few years. To Franckes joy, he replied that he was willing-if he could see it to be the will of God. December 9, he preached his farewell sermon under consid-erable emotion. After some weeks of preparation at home, hecrossed to London, where he delayed to study English. Thencesetting sail, June 13, 1742, he came to Charleston, South Caro-lina, to visit the Salzburgers, to cheer them, and to learn of theirpioneer life. His boat was unseaworthy and overloaded. There was dangerof pirates. But upon hearing a poor Salzburger mother on

 

Text Appearing After Image:

HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG board sing A Mighty Fortress Is Our God, he exclaimed,That is better protection than the ten iron cannon with whichthe vessel is provided. After a helpful visit to the Lutherans in South Carolina, hesailed northward. The voyage was so tempestuous that Muhlen-berg, though he preached as had been his custom to those onboard, had to do so from his bed. Sailing up the Delaware, hepassed Tinicum where a century before had been built thefirst Lutheran church in America. He landed at Philadelphia,no one present to welcome him, November 24, 1742. Acci-dentally meeting a member of the New Hanover congregation,and knowing no one in Philadelphia, he set out with him forthis church, thirty-six miles northward, on horseback, sustainedby his motto, Ecclesia plantanda, The Church must be planted. ( )n the following Sunday he preached there, in the rude pulpit112 MCHLENBERG of a log building not yet finished within. The second Sunday hepreached in Philadelphia, in the foreno

  

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Taken circa 1918