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Image from page 78 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cult | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 78 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cult

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

on the traditions, so to say, of very interestingEnglish and Scottish gardens of the past, in which numbers of beauti-ful open air things were grown—among those I have had the happi-ness to see were the late Mr. Borrers at Henfield in Sussex, a gardenmuseum of beautiful hardy plants and of rare British forms of plants andtrees ; the Ellacombes garden at Bitton ; Mr. Leeds garden at Man-chester ; Stirlings at Edinburgh ; Comely Bank, a home for the rarestand most beautiful plants ; the Rev. Harpur Crewes ; Mr. Atkinssgarden at Painswick ; Sir George McLeays at Pendell Court; MajorGaisfords at Offington, and many other delightful gardens. The richesof the collection in such gardens are a source of danger as to effect, thevery number of plants often leading to a neglect of breadth andsimplicity of effect; but there is no real reason why a garden, richin many plants, may not also be beautiful in its masses, airiness andverdure. A mile to the east the well-wooded and well-heathered range

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Wilton, lookinij

 

 

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