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Image from page 866 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 866 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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tener.S. Europe. S. sibirica {Siberian S.).—A minute gemamong the flowers of earliest spring, andno rock-garden, or garden of any kind, iscomplete without the striking and peculiarshade of porcelain - blue which dis-tinguishes this from all other Scillas. S.sibirica has many names, but, unlike S.bifolia., it has sported into few varieties,the chief being alba, a pure white kind,3 I 2 852 THE ENGLISH FLOWER GARDEN. scolopenurium. \ery good for early forcing, and multi-flora, an early variety blooming threeweeks in advance of its parent. Varietieswith larger flowers, and with one on a steminstead of two or five, are preserved inherbariums and sometimes cultivated, butthe difference between these and the typeis trifling, arising often from the conditionsin which the plants are placed. 6. sibiricais hardy, and thrives best in a goodsandy soil. Bulbs used for forcing shouldne\-er be thrown away, for they thrivewell if allowed to fully develop theirleaves and go to rest in a pit or frame.

 

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afterwards being planted out in open spotsin warm soil, where their usual vigouris soon restored. They may then be liftedand forced as before. It is unnecessaryto disturb the tufts, except every two orthree years for division, when they growvigorously. S. sibirica flowers a little laterthan S. bi/olia, but withstands the stormsbetter, remaining also much longer inbloom. In places where it does not thrivefreely, whether from coldness of the soilor from other causes, give it a shelteredposition, to prevent injury to its leaves.The Siberian Squill may be used as an edging to beds of spring flowers or choicealpine shrubs. Other cultivated Kinds.—AmongstScillas not generally found in gardens, buthardy in dry situations, may be named S.peruviana, a large species, with beautifulbroad leaves. Yucca-like and very dis-tinct ; it stands well in sheltered nooks,or even in the open border in southerndistricts. The numerous fine blue flowersare in a superb umbel-like pyramid, whichlengthens durin

 

 

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