new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
Image from page 80 of "The new art of memory, founded upon the principles taught by M. Gregor von Feinaigle: and applied to chronology, history, geography, languages, systematic tables, poetry, prose, and arithmetic. To which is added, some account of the | by Internet Archive Book Images
Back to photostream

Image from page 80 of "The new art of memory, founded upon the principles taught by M. Gregor von Feinaigle: and applied to chronology, history, geography, languages, systematic tables, poetry, prose, and arithmetic. To which is added, some account of the

Identifier: artofmemoryfound00fein

Title: The new art of memory, founded upon the principles taught by M. Gregor von Feinaigle: and applied to chronology, history, geography, languages, systematic tables, poetry, prose, and arithmetic. To which is added, some account of the principal systems of artificial memory, from the earliest period to the present time; with instances of the extraordinary powers of natural memory ..

Year: 1813 (1810s)

Authors: Feinaigle, Gregor von, 1765?-1819

Subjects: Mnemonics

Publisher: London, Printed by R. Edwards for the proprietor, and sold by Sherwood, Neely, and Jones

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

 

 

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

 

 

Text Appearing Before Image:

emember the symbols,or hieroglyphics, as to remember the situation orplace of any picture, or article of furniture in aroom. Instead of having a carpet on the floor,we can suppose that the floor is inlaid or con-structed of mosaic. This will allow us to putsymbols there. The outlines of the symbols are intended torepresent, as accurately as possible, the variousfigures in the two rooms, so that they maybe permanently fixed in the memory. (SeePlates It, and III.) And here we dismiss thepupil for a season, giving a general hint, thatit will be advisable to make himself perfect-ly familiar with the situations of the differentsymbols, before he thinks of looking into thenext chapter. Until a knowledge of thesesymbols be obtained, no further progress canbe made in the system. It is, at least, indis-pensably necessary, that the pupil should answerwith facility to any questions put to him respect-ing ihe Jirst room, containing fifty symbols ; thesecond room may be acquired at leisure. ll„r

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PRINCIPLES. 53 The following are the names attached to thedifferent symbols: fiz$t ftoom* 1 Tower of BabeL 2 Swan. 3 Mountain, or Parnassus. 4 Looking-glass. 5 Throne. 6 Horn of Plenty. 7 Glass-blower. 8 Midas. 9 Flower, or Narcissus. 10 Goliath, or Mars. 11 Pillars of Hercules. 12 David with the Lion. 13 Castle, or Nelsons Mo- nument. 14 Diogenes, or Watchman. 15 .ZEseulapius, or Serpent. 16 Ceres, or Gleaner. 17 Archimedes, or Carpen- ter. 18 Apollo. 19 Robinson Crusoe.26 Peacock. 21 Vaulter, or Rider. 22 Cockfighting. 23 Pegasus.-24 Elepha;it. 25 Sancho Panza. 26 Charioteer. 27 Don Quixote. 28 Pack-horse. 29 Standard-bearer- 30 Sysiphus. 31 Cupid. 32 Diana-. 33 Clouds, or Sky. 34 Noahs Ark. 35 Cartius. 36 Hermitage. 37 Miner. 38 Moses. 39 Vesuvius. 40 Pleasure Garden. 41 Monument. 42 Golden Calf. 43 State Bed. 44 Piano-Forte. 45 Bajazet. 46 Fountain, or Square. 47 Vulcan, 48 Apis. 49 Orange-Tree.fiO Bacchus. * s 54 NEW ART OF MBMbftft ^CCOllfc $00m» 51 Pigmalion. 52 Jupiter. 53 Ne

 

 

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

3,548 views
3 faves
0 comments