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Image from page 243 of "Our deportment; or, The manners, conduct and dress of the most refined society; including forms for letters, invitations, etc., etc. Also, valuable suggestions on home culture and training" (1885) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 243 of "Our deportment; or, The manners, conduct and dress of the most refined society; including forms for letters, invitations, etc., etc. Also, valuable suggestions on home culture and training" (1885)

Identifier: ourdeportmentor00youn

Title: Our deportment; or, The manners, conduct and dress of the most refined society; including forms for letters, invitations, etc., etc. Also, valuable suggestions on home culture and training

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Young, John H

Subjects: Etiquette

Publisher: Detroit, Mich. [etc.] F.B. Dickerson & Co.

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

 

 

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books and sensational novels. The poison im-bibed from bad books works so secretly that their influ-ence for evil is even greater than the influence of bad TM,Ml«MWM,M,(J<<iM,rU«l<:i«i«ilSUM,?ail^t»!!,7;»8 = ^1Uinifft:«:L;n.,«i1MUIl!^l6^(>lMl.niMli>ll,>~ .HUl^HUkraitMlriniMUM^naMUMiMUltMkan^MtMklM^Mb^lirM^liMliMi^ltMWM^MiMt^MiiMHl^il.ll^MiiMuiltMliliMliMk^ltM 232 HOME CULTURE. associates. The mother has it in her power to make,such books the companions and friends of her childrenas her good judgment may select, and to impress uponthem their truths, by conversing with them about themoral lessons or the intellectual instructions they con-tain. A taste may be easily cultivated for books onnatural science and for history, as well as for those thatteach important and wholesome lessons for the young,such as are contained in the works of Mrs. Edgeworth,Mrs Child, Mrs. Yonge, and many other books writtenfor the young.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

AMk^ntMI^IkMtiUUnkMUMtMltMkfMtM^tbiniiM^iuMUMBMUitb/iBin^Ii^HMcfniM^niltifMtlUMiMltlkMlaIk^laMl^lkMllUt ^iniMUMtMulWUiin^l.MiilttflluMWn.MtMl.HWM.MuM^MutiMl.MWM^Ml^a.MuM.Ml.MiMl.MuMiMltMi^liMiilltMllMiHuMi/. CHAPTER XXI. v -i *T has been seen that in the rearing andtraining of her children, woman hasa great work to perform; that in thiswork she exerts an incalculable influ-ence upon untold numbers, and thatshe molds the minds and charactersof her sons and daughters. Howimportant, then, that she should cultivateher mental faculties to the highest extent,if for no other reason than to fit herselfthe better for the performance of thisgreat duty of educating her children. Howimportant it is, also, that she should look tothe higher education of her daughters, who,in turn, will become mothers of future generations, ormay, perhaps, by some vicissitude of fortune, becomedependent upon their own resources for support. Withthe highest culture of the mental faculties, woman willbe best enabled t

 

 

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Taken circa 1885